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10 heads of state in Kigali for 25th anniversary of Rwanda genocide


At least 10 heads of state traveled to Rwanda on Sunday to commemorate the lives of 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutus murdered during the Rwandan genocide 25 years ago.

Rwandan President Paul Kagame delivers key note address at an event to commemorate the Rwandan genocide that began on April 6, 1994. Photo: OVP Media

Those in attendance included Canadian Governor General Julie Payette and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

Photo: OVP Media

The Rwanda genocide lasted 100 days as the world looked away while blacks were killing themselves. It all began on April 6, 1994, when a plane carrying President Juvenal Habyarimana of Rwanda, and his counterpart Cyprien Ntaryamira of Burundi — both Hutus — was shot down by unknown attackers, killing both leaders.

The Rwanda genocide lasted 100 days as the world looked away while blacks were killing themselves. It all began on April 6, 1994, when a plane carrying President Juvenal Habyarimana of Rwanda, and his counterpart Cyprien Ntaryamira of Burundi — both Hutus — was shot down by unknown attackers, killing both leaders.

The Hutus quickly blamed the Tutsi for the attack and began slaughtering them. In the end, at least 800 thousand Tutsi and some moderate Hutus were killed.


The Hutus quickly blamed the Tutsi for the attack and began slaughtering them. In the end, at 800 thousand Tutsi and some moderate Hutus were killed.

“There is no way to fully comprehend the loneliness and anger of survivors and yet over and over again we have asked them to make the sacrifices necessary to give our nation new life. Emotions had to be put in a box,” Rwanda President Paul Kagame said.

“We are far better Rwandans than we were. But we can be even better still. We are the last people in the world who should succumb to complacency.”

Kagame laid a wreath at the Gisozi genocide memorial site where over a quarter a million of people are buried, before the government began an afternoon of speeches and song, according to Reuters. 

“Among the legacies of the genocide is the International Criminal Court, which grew out of tribunals to investigate and prosecute those responsible for atrocities committed in Rwanda and during the Balkan wars of the 1990s,” Reuters added.

Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Born in a small village in Cameroon, groomed in Nigeria's most populous city of Lagos, and now in Washington D.C. to practice journalism at a global level, Simon is an investigative journalist and publisher of TODAY NEWS AFRICA based in Washington DC
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Born in a small village in Cameroon, groomed in Nigeria's most populous city of Lagos, and now in Washington D.C. to practice journalism at a global level, Simon is an investigative journalist and publisher of TODAY NEWS AFRICA based in Washington DC

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