300 Christians killed by Fulani militants in Nigeria since February, Barnabas Fund says Updated for 2021

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Updated: February 27, 2021


About 300 people were killed in at least seven predominantly Christian villages across Kaduna State, northern Nigeria, in February and March 2019, the Barnabas Fund said in a statement on Tuesday, quoting contacts on the ground and adding that brutal rapes and maiming with machetes were widespread.

“In a dawn attack on Karamai on 14 February, 41 died when some 300 gunmen engulfed the village, chanting “Allahu Akbar!” as they fired their guns and ransacked homes. Almost all the dead were women and children, apart from a few elderly and blind men who were unable to flee,” the Fund said.

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Killed in God’s name

“Up to 71 people were killed and 28 injured in a Fulani militia attack on 11 March in Dogon Noma village, Kaduna State,” Barnabas Fund added.

The report, posted online, quoted eyewitnesses, as saying that the gunmen were “torching houses, shooting and hacking down anything that moved”. Some 100 houses were destroyed in the attack.

President Donald Trump had told President Muhammadu Buhari last year during a meeting at the White House to stop the masdacre of Christians in northern Nigeria, but so far very little has been done.

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Barnabas Fund contacts report that nearly 300 people were killed in at least seven predominantly Christian villages across Kaduna State, Nigeria, in February and March 2019; brutal rapes and maiming with machetes were also reported.

In a dawn attack on Karamai on 14 February, 41 died when some 300 gunmen engulfed the village, chanting “Allahu Akbar!” as they fired their guns and ransacked homes. Almost all the dead were women and children, apart from a few elderly and blind men who were unable to flee.

Up to 71 people were killed and 28 injured in a Fulani militia attack on 11 March in Dogon Noma village, Kaduna State. According to eyewitness accounts, the gunmen were “torching houses, shooting and hacking down anything that moved”. Some 100 houses were destroyed in the attack.

Houses in Karamai village that were burnt out in a Fulani attack.

A further nine were reportedly killed in Nandu Gbok, also in Kaduna State on 16 March and 30 houses destroyed.

In Kajuru district in February and March, the bodies of about 73 women, some pregnant, and 101 children ranging from babies on their mothers’ backs up to 10-year-olds, were interred in a mass-grave.

Witnesses said most of the men in the villages fled when the raid started in the early morning in Dogon Noma and Karamai. Others were thought to be assisting in neighbouring villages that had been attacked in the preceding days.

During Nigeria’s recent election President Buhari, who was re-elected, campaigned on the promise to “bring permanent peace and solution” to the north east and other regions of “insurgency”, specifically mentioning Plateau, Benue and Kaduna States.

Church leaders in Nigeria have also repeatedly called on the President, who is himself a Fulani Muslim, to take decisive action against the scourge of attacks by Fulani herdsmen on Christian farming communities.

Attacks by armed Fulani herdsman are a constant threat for the predominantly Christian population of Nigeria’s Middle Belt. In the last two years, Fulani militants have murdered more than 6,000, according to church estimates. They also destroy church buildings and homes in their attacks which deliberately target Christian communities. Since 2001 at least 500 church buildings have been razed in Plateau State alone.

From Barnabas Fund contacts.

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Simon Ateba
Simon Ateba
Simon Ateba covers the White House, the U.S. government, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other financial and international institutions for Today News Africa in Washington D.C. Simon can be reached on simonateba@todaynewsafrica.com

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