Biden highlights U.S. commitment to climate-smart agriculture research and innovation

AIM for Climate is a pioneering initiative led by the United States and the United Arab Emirates that is focused on increasing investment and enabling greater public-private and cross-sectoral partnerships to drive climate-smart agriculture and food systems.

At COP26, President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has highlighted USAID’s commitment to the Agriculture Innovation Mission for Climate (AIM for Climate) to support research and innovation in climate-smart agriculture.

AIM for Climate is a pioneering initiative led by the United States and the United Arab Emirates that is focused on increasing investment and enabling greater public-private and cross-sectoral partnerships to drive climate-smart agriculture and food systems.

USAID says the initiative has garnered global momentum with more than 80 partners, including 33 countries, adding that the United States will mobilize $1 billion over five years for AIM for Climate.

USAID, the premier international agency in adaptation and a global leader in agriculture research, is working in concert with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the State Department’s Special Presidential Envoy for Climate on AIM for Climate.

“USAID’s commitments to climate-smart agriculture include at least $215 million over five years to support the critical work of Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), a global research partnership for a food-secure future, to help 200 million people raise agricultural productivity in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa by 25 percent by 2030,” the agency said in a statement. “As a founding member of CGIAR, USAID is one of the largest financial donors, garnering significant return on investment: for every $1 invested in CGIAR, there are $10 of benefits. CGIAR investments in wheat alone generate over $2 billion per year in value and food security gains for hundreds of millions of low-income people around the world. More broadly, CGIAR research is estimated to have lifted food production in developing countries by seven to eight percent, and in some of the most vulnerable areas, by much larger amounts.”

Chief White House Correspondent for

Simon Ateba is Chief White House Correspondent for Today News Africa. Simon covers President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, the U.S. government, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other financial and international institutions in Washington D.C. and New York City.

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