Buhari to finally address Nigerians as country slips into chaos

1,007FollowersFollow

President Muhammadu Buhari will make a national broadcast Thursday, October 22, 2020, at 7p.m., the Nigerian presidency said in a statement on Thursday, as the country seemed to be slipping into chaos.

The presidency said the address is coming “following detailed briefing by security chiefs on the current situation in the country.”

The national broadcast is also coming on the same day Nigerians in the United States announced they would hold the ‘mother of all protests’ on Saturday against police brutality and bad governance in their home country.

The peaceful protest, to last at least three hours, would begin at 3 p.m. in Randallstown, Baltimore County, Maryland, United States.

“We want our brothers and sisters in Nigeria to know we are with them in this struggle. We are tired of seeing the blood of innocent citizens on the streets of Nigeria,” some of the organizers said in a joint statement to Today News Africa in Washington D.C. on Thursday morning.

“We are tired of police brutality, bad governance, corruption and joblessness,” they said, adding that it would likely be the “mother of all protests” against police brutality and bad leadership across Africa’s most populous nation.

The attendance is likely to be massive, the organizers said, citing the overwhelming number of phone calls they have been receiving since Monday.

The protest would kick off in front of Randallstown Library on Liberty Road, Baltimore, Maryland.

Protesters were advised to wear face masks and would social distance to keep everyone safe amid the raging coronavirus pandemic around the world.

Anger has been rising across the United States after images surfaced early this week showing security forces in Nigeria responding to peaceful protests against police brutality with more violence.

On Thursday, the Trump administration strongly condemned “the use of excessive force by military forces who fired on unarmed demonstrators in Lagos, causing death and injury.”

“We welcome an immediate investigation into any use of excessive force by members of the security forces. Those involved should be held to account in accordance with Nigerian law,” Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo said in a statement.

Pompeo said the right to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression are essential human rights and core democratic principles. 

“We call on the security services to show maximum restraint and respect fundamental rights and for demonstrators to remain peaceful.  We extend our condolences to the victims of the violence and their families,” he added.

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo holds a press conference, in Brussels, Belgium on November 20, 2019. [State Department Photo by Ron Przysucha/ Public Domain]
Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo holds a press conference, in Brussels, Belgium on November 20, 2019. [State Department Photo by Ron Przysucha/ Public Domain]

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton on Wednesday also condemned the use of force against peaceful protesters in Nigeria on Tuesday, saying the government should engage in peaceful dialogue.

“I am deeply concerned over reports of violence in Lagos and urge the Nigerian government to engage in peaceful dialogue with the #EndSARS protestors for police reform and an end to corruption,” Bill Clinton tweeted.

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a campaign event for Hillary Clinton at Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Council Bluffs, Iowa in 2016. Photo: Matt A.J.
Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a campaign event for Hillary Clinton at Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Council Bluffs, Iowa in 2016. Photo: Matt A.J.

Former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had also on Tuesday called on President Muhammadu Buhari and the Nigerian army to “stop killing young #ENDSARS protesters.”

Pompeo: US' way of life remains 'the envy for the entire world'
In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton talks with Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief of The Atlantic, during The Atlantic Festival, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Alex Brandon )

“I’m calling on @mbuhari and the @hqnigerianarmy to stop killing young #EndSARS protesters. #StopNigeriaGovernment,” she tweeted.

A former president of Chile, who is now the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, on Wednesday, also strongly condemned the use of excessive and disproportionate force by Nigerian armed forces in Lagos on Tuesday evening. She called on the Nigerian authorities to take urgent steps to deal decisively with the underlying problem of persistent violations committed by the security forces, and make a far stronger effort to bring police and army personnel guilty of crimes against civilians to justice.

Verónica Michelle Bachelet Jeria served as President of Chile from 2006 to 2010 and again from 2014 to 2018 for the Socialist Party of Chile, the first woman to occupy the position.

Michelle Bachelet
Former President of Chile Michelle Bachelet

“While the number of casualties of yesterday’s shooting at the Lekki toll plaza in Lagos is still not clear, there is little doubt that this was a case of excessive use of force, resulting in unlawful killings with live ammunition, by Nigerian armed forces,” Bachelet said. “Reports that CCTV cameras and lighting were deliberately disabled prior to the shooting are even more disturbing as, if confirmed, they suggest this deplorable attack on peaceful protestors was premeditated, planned and coordinated.”

“Nigeria was already at boiling point before this shooting because of the revelations about years of unchecked violence, including alleged killings, rape, extortion and other violations, by the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS),” the UN Human Rights Chief continued. “While the authorities have now dissolved SARS and announced a series of inquiries at both Federal and State levels, there have still been few if any charges levelled against its members despite abundant evidence against various members of the squad, as well as members of other security forces and the army.”

At least 12 Nigerian protesters were killed on Tuesday in two locations in the commercial city of Lagos, Amnesty International said on Wednesday following an investigation. About 38 people were killed nationwide on Tuesday, the group added.

“An on-the-ground investigation by Amnesty International has confirmed that the Nigerian army and police killed at least 12 peaceful protesters yesterday at two locations in Lagos. The killings took place in Lekki and Alausa, where thousands were protesting police brutality as part of the #EndSars movement,” Amnesty International said.

The rights group, which has been monitoring developments across Nigeria since the #EndSars protest began on October 8, 2020, said at least 56 people have died across the country since the protest began, with about 38 killed on Tuesday alone.

Victims include protesters and thugs who were allegedly hired by the authorities to confront the protesters. In many cases the security forces had used excessive force in an attempt to control or stop the protests, Amnesty International added.

It said “evidence gathered from eyewitnesses, video footage and hospital reports confirm that between 6:45pm and 9:00pm on Tuesday 20 October, the Nigerian military opened fire on thousands of people who were peacefully calling for good governance and an end to police brutality.”

“Witnesses at the Lekki protest grounds told Amnesty international that solders arrived at about 6:45pm local time on Tuesday evening, and opened fire on #EndSars protesters without warning. Eyewitnesses at Alausa protest ground said they were attacked by a team of soldiers and policemen from the Rapid Response Squad (RRS) Unit at about 8:00 pm, leaving at least two people dead and one critically injured.”

Osai Ojigho, Country Director of Amnesty International Nigeria condemned the killings, saying “opening fire on peaceful protesters is a blatant violation of people’s rights to life, dignity, freedom of expression and peaceful assembly.  Soldiers clearly had one intention – to kill without consequences.”

Amnesty International said it received reports that shortly before the shootings, CCTV cameras at the Lekki toll gate, where #EndSARS protesters had been camped for two weeks, were removed by government officials and the electricity was cut – a clear attempt to hide evidence.

As in previous cases documented by Amnesty International, some of those killed and injured at both grounds were allegedly taken away by the military.

“These shootings clearly amount to extrajudicial executions. There must be an immediate investigation and suspected perpetrators must be held accountable through fair trials. Authorities must ensure access to justice and effective remedies for the victims and their families,” said Osai Ojigho.

Africa’s most populous country with more than 200 million people has been slipping into chaos in the past one week. In the commercial city of Lagos on Tuesday, heavily armed security officers were said to have shot dead dozens of protesters who have been demanding an end to police brutality.

Local reports said there was heavy shooting at the Lekki Toll Gate area in Lagos on Tuesday evening as the protesters defied a government curfew.

Human Rights Watch said on Wednesday that Nigerian authorities on Tuesday “turned a peaceful protest against police brutality into a shooting spree.”

The rights group said “on the evening of October 20, 2020, Nigerian army soldiers opened fire at a crowd of protesters in Lagos who were calling for an end to police brutality.”

“Nigerian authorities turned a peaceful protest against police brutality into a shooting spree, showing the ugly depths they are willing to go to suppress the voices of citizens,” wrote Anietie Ewang, Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch.

Ewang called on Nigerian authorities to “immediately withdraw the military from the streets, and identify and prosecute officers responsible for or complicit in any excessive use of force against peaceful protesters.”

For more than a week, peaceful protesters in Nigeria have been demanding that the government steps in and ends police brutality. But the government responded with force, triggering more protests and new demands.

Also on Wednesday, Nigeria’s Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) sent a petition to Mrs Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor, International Criminal Court (ICC), urging her to “promptly investigate reports that Nigerian authoritiesmilitary, and some politicians have used/ and are using thugs, soldiers and security agents to intimidate, harass, attack and kill #EndSARS peaceful protesters in several parts of Nigeria, including Abuja, Lagos, Edo, Osun, Plateau, and Kano states.”

SERAP urged Mrs Bensouda to “push for those suspected to be responsible for these crimes, mostly security officials, soldiers, some politicians and other actors who directly or indirectly have individually and/or collectively contributed to the attacks, deaths and injuries, and are therefore complicit in the crimes, to be tried by the ICC.”

In another statement on Tuesday, SERAP condemned “reports that security agents are shooting at #EndSARS peaceful protesters at the Lekki Toll gate in Lagos.”

“This must stop immediately,” the group said as videos emerged that the country was slipping into chaos.

SERAP said: “Under the Nigerian constitution, 1999 [as amended] and human rights treaties to which Nigeria is a state party, the authorities are obligated to respect and protect the right to life and security of the person, the rights to freedom of expression, association, and peaceful assembly of everyone, including peaceful protesters.”

“We call on the Nigeria authorities to order a prompt, independent and impartial inquiry into the reports of shooting of #EndSARS protesters at the Lekki Toll gate by security agents, identify suspected perpetrators and ensure that they are brought to justice without delay.”

“All the victims must be allowed access to justice and effective remedies, including adequate compensation, satisfaction and guarantee of non-repetition.”

“SERAP calls on the International Criminal Court (ICC) to open investigations into cases of attacks on peaceful protesters in Nigeria in the context of #EndSARS.”

“SERAP believes that substantial grounds exist to warrant the intervention of the Prosecutor in this case. Pursuant to the Rome Statute, the Prosecutor has power to intervene in a situation under the jurisdiction of the Court if the Security Council or states parties refer a situation or if information is provided from other sources such as the information that is now publicly available in the country.”

On Friday, Human Rights Watch expressed outrage as security forces continued to respond to overwhelmingly peaceful protests against police brutality with more violence and abuse.

Nationwide protests began on October 8, 2020, calling on the authorities to abolish an abusive police unit called the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS). In response, the police have shot tear gas, water cannons, and live rounds at protesters, killing at least four people and wounding many others. Armed thugs have also disrupted protests and attacked protesters.

“People exercising their right to protest and calling for an end to police brutality are themselves being brutalized and harassed by those who should protect them,” said Anietie Ewang, Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch. “This underscores the importance of the protesters’ demands and the culture of impunity across the policing system, which is in dire need of reform.”

The protests were sparked by a video that surfaced online on October 3, allegedly showing a SARS officer shooting a young man in Delta state. This generated an outcry on social media, especially Twitter, where the hashtag #EndSARS began trending globally, and led to protests across Nigeria and in other cities around the world.

Responding in part to the protesters’ demands, the government announced on October 11 that the SARS unit would be disbanded. Yet its members will be integrated into other police units following “psychological tests,” and SARS is to be replaced by a Special Weapons and Tactical Team that is to begin training next week. No steps have been taken to hold SARS officers to account for past abuses, or to investigate and prosecute those responsible for the recent crackdown on protesters.

SARS was formed in 1992 to combat armed robbery and other serious crimes. Yet since its inception, the unit has allegedly been implicated in widespread human rights abuses, including extrajudicial killings, torture, arbitrary arrests, unlawful detention, and extortion. Many Nigerians feel that the unit has deliberately profiled and targeted young people, especially those with tattoos, dreadlocks, and visible possessions such as phones and laptops. Over the years, Nigerian authorities have repeatedly promised to reform SARS and ensure accountability for abuses by its officers, but with few results.

Although the authorities have now agreed to abolish SARS and take measures to end police brutality, the protests led by young Nigerians have continued. Protesters are calling for more far-reaching reforms and critical action to address police brutality, especially in the wake of attacks against protesters.

On October 10, a young man, Jimoh Isiaka, was allegedly killed when police opened fire to disperse protesters in Ogbomosho, Oyo state, media reports and Amnesty International have said. At least two other people – a man and a teenage boy – were killed the following day in protests against Isiaka’s death, based on a Premium Times investigation that included a video purporting to show police officers dragging bodies into an armored personnel carrier after the shooting.

The Oyo state governor confirmed that three people were killed and at least six others injured during protests in the state. The police said in a statement that they only used tear gas to disperse the protesters and denied allegations of any shooting on October 10.

In Abuja, police dispersed protesters on October 11 with tear gas and water cannons. Human Rights Watch interviewed three people who participated in or were in the vicinity of the protests and were badly beaten by officers.

One, a 30-year-old woman, said that at least four police officers beat her with big sticks and batons soon after the police fired tear gas and water cannons on protesters.

“When we saw officers down the road from us had formed a line facing us, we stopped moving and we sat on the ground or knelt down to show them that we were not aggressive,” she said. “But before we knew it, tear gas started flying all over the place and a strong force of water followed for about 10 to 15 minutes nonstop. I had a mask on and with the water hitting my face, I found it very difficult to breathe. They soon started running in our direction. I didn’t run because I shouldn’t have to; I was not doing anything wrong.”

The woman said that one officer began beating her with a stick, and when she tried to ward him off, two others joined in, with a stick and baton. She lay flat on the ground as they continued beating her. Eventually someone who had been observing and filming on the other side of the road came by in his car and shouted at her to get in. As she tried to get in the car, another officer hit her back with a big stick. She said that the beating fractured her skull and she has had dizzy spells since. She has been hospitalized.

Another, a 28-year-old woman, said that she was on her way home from work on October 11 around the Federal Secretariat in Abuja when she saw a crowd of people running in her direction. She also started running but soon stopped to figure out where she was going.

“As soon as the police arrived there and saw me, one asked me what I was doing there, and when I replied that I was on my way back from work, he asked, ‘Which work?’” she said. “I didn’t even get a chance to explain or show identification before others came and started beating me with big sticks. About six officers gathered around me, beating me as I lay on the ground. One even threatened me with a knife; they emptied the contents of my bag all over the floor and smashed my phone before they let me go.”

On October 12, police officers in Surulere, Lagos, opened gunfire to disperse protesters, killing 55-year-old Ikechukwu Ilohamauzo, media reported. Human Rights Watch interviewed two protesters and one journalist at the scene. One protester said that the police arrived and opened fire to disperse the protesters when they were close to a police station around Western Avenue. As he and others were running, they realized that a man had been hit by a bullet and went back to where he was. The protesters watched and filmed as a medical team tried to give the man emergency care, but he died. Human Rights Watch reviewed the footage and has it on file.

Media reports said that Ilohamauzo was a driver stuck in traffic in the vicinity of the protests who came out of his vehicle to urinate when he was struck by a stray bullet.

Police in Surulere claim that Ilohamauzo was killed by a stray bullet from protesters who they say also shot and killed a police officer during an attack on the police station. They arrested three protesters whom they claim were responsible. Videos have since surfaced online, however, that purport to show that the officer fell to the ground after a burst of fire from his colleagues. The protesters were eventually released. Human Rights Watch has not seen any evidence indicating that protesters were armed or firing on the crowd.

The police arrested dozens of protesters, refused some of them access to their lawyers, and only released them following the intervention of senior government officials, including the state governors and the Senate President. There have been reports of police damaging and confiscating the cameras of protesters and journalists. Alleged pro-government thugs have also injured protesters and destroyed property, media reported.

On October 15, the Nigerian army warned “subversive elements and troublemakers” to desist and offered to “support the civil authority in whatever capacity to maintain law and order.” The Nigerian army has also been implicated in human rights abuses, including the use of lethal force against peaceful protesters.

The right to peaceful protest is guaranteed by the Nigerian constitution and international human rights law. Unnecessary use of force to disperse protesters is unlawful. Protesters should instead be protected by the authorities.

Human Rights Watch has documented human rights abuses by the Nigerian police force for years. In a 2010 report, Human Rights Watch cautioned that the long-term failure of the authorities to address abuses by the police would reinforce impunity and lead to more systemic abuses.

“Nigerian authorities can no longer evade the need for serious reform and accountability in the police system,” Ewang said. “They should go beyond words and send a signal that it is no longer business as usual by investigating the attacks on protesters and taking immediate steps to hold officers and others accountable.”

Simon Ateba
Simon Ateba
Based in Washington, District of Columbia, United States of America, Simon leads a brilliant team of reporters, freelance journalists, analysts, researchers and contributors from around the world to run TODAY NEWS AFRICA as editor-in-chief. Simon Ateba's journalistic experience spans over 10 years and covers many beats, including business and investment, information technology, politics, diplomacy, human rights, science reporting and much more. Write him: simonateba@todaynewsafrica.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Trending Now

U.S. calls for independent probe into massacres in Tigray region in Ethiopia

The United States government on Thursday called for an independent investigation following massacres in the Tigray region in Ethiopia.The United States said the investigation...

Trump campaign files appeal after Judge called legal claim in Pennsylvania “Frankenstein’s Monster” before dismissing it

President Donald Trump’s legal team on Sunday filed an appeal to a federal judge’s ruling that dismissed his campaign's effort to block the certification...

Biden announces foreign policy and national security team, including Blinken as Secretary of State, Mayorkas as Secretary of Homeland Security and Kerry as envoy on climate

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden on Monday announced key members of his foreign policy and national security team, including Antony Blinken as Secretary of State;...

Angry South African President fully rejects US allegations against him and his Phala Phala wildlife farm over treatment of animals

In a statement on Saturday, the presidency in South Africa said allegations against President Cyril Ramaphosa and his Phala Phala wildlife farm over the...

Nigerian anti-narcotic agents call for immediate sack of their boss, demand judicial panel of inquiry to probe his many sins

Officials of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency in Nigeria have called on President Muhammadu Buhari to immediately sack the Chairman/Chief Executive Col. Muhammad...

U.S. government has no evidence WHO director general Tedros Adhnom Ghebreyesus is backing Tigray rebels

The United States government on Thursday indicated that it did not have any evidence the director general of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros...

Special security squad searches Atiku Abubakar, Nigeria’s main opposition candidate at airport

The main opposition candidate in Nigeria, Mr Atiku Abubakar, was thoroughly searched when he returned to the country from Dubai on Sunday morning.The search...

WHO warns up to 5 million people could die without 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week

Up to 5 million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active. At a time when many people are...

President-elect Joe Biden and Dr. Jill Biden wish nation Happy Thanksgiving in moving CNN op-ed

“Like you, our family will hold on to our most important tradition: taking a moment to count the many reasons we have to be...

WHO urges African countries to ramp up readiness for COVID-19 vaccination drive

As the race to find a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is showing increasing promise, a new World Health Organization (WHO) analysis finds that Africa is...

Remembering soccer legend Diego Maradona

World soccer great Diego Maradona died on Wednesday from a heart attack, less than a month after his 60th birthday.He died at home...

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva heartbroken over passing of former World Bank President James D. Wolfensohn

The Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Ms. Kristalina Georgieva on Wednesday expressed deep sadness over the passing of Sir James David Wolfensohn,...

Trump announces full pardon for Michael Flynn

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced that he had granted full pardon to the former national security adviser, Michael Flynn."It is my Great Honor...

Biden delivers inspiring thanksgiving message to the nation, urges Americans to come together, defeat COVID-19 and dream again

U.S. President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Wednesday delivered an inspiring thanksgiving message to the nation, urged Americans to come together, defeat COVID-19 and...

WHO warns up to 5 million people could die without 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week

Up to 5 million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active. At a time when many people are home bound due to COVID-19, new WHO Guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behavior, launched on Thursday, emphasize that everyone, of all ages and abilities, can be physically active and that every type of movement counts.The new guidelines recommend at least 150...
error: Alert: Content is protected !!
Share
Tweet
WhatsApp
Pin
Share