March 26, 2023

Egypt, Ghana, Mozambique, Tunisia: Bilateral meetings held at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit December 14, 2022

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

The second day of the US-Africa Leaders Summit concluded on Wednesday with a number of bilateral meetings. Following are some press releases on bilateral meetings held at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, day 2, December 14, 2022:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with Namibian President Hage Geingob in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with Namibian President Hage Geingob in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
President Joseph R. Biden Jr. delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
President Joseph R. Biden Jr. delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Egyptian President El-Sisi

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 14, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi in Washington, D.C. during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Secretary Blinken underscored our commitment to the U.S.-Egypt strategic partnership, commended Egypt’s successful hosting of COP27, and discussed a wide range of issues, including Egypt’s important role in promoting stability in the region and our decades-long bilateral defense ties. He emphasized the importance of a diplomatic resolution on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam that would safeguard the interests of all parties. The Secretary also reiterated that the bilateral relationship is strengthened by tangible progress on human rights in Egypt. The Secretary recognized Egypt’s recent releases of political detainees and encouraged further progress to advance human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Ghanaian President Akufo-Addo

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 14, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Ghanaian President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington, D.C.  Secretary Blinken thanked President Akufo-Addo for Ghana’s strong collaboration with the United States on the United Nations Security Council.  They also discussed our shared commitment to bolster economic growth and investment, democracy, and security in West Africa.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary Antony J. Blinken and Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo Before Their Meeting

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 14, 2022

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  So this is a very good occasion, but it’s a particularly good occasion because we greatly value Ghana’s leadership and your leadership in West Africa, the important efforts on regional security.  We’re strong partners, including on the UN Security Council, which we greatly value, partners for democracy and security in West Africa, and we greatly appreciate the peacekeeping contributions that Ghana makes, but also just more broadly your own leadership for peace, for security, for democracy.  Many, many challenges, but we’re grateful to actually be facing them together and really pleased to have you here this week for the summit.  So thank you, Mr. President.  Appreciate the time.

PRESIDENT AKUFO-ADDO:  So Mr. Secretary, thank you very much.  I want to thank the American Government for the invitation to participate in this summit.  I think it’s a summit that’s been long overdue.  I believe it’s the second – the last time was, what, over 10 years ago.  Perhaps we should be doing it more, but it’s good that it has happened.  It gives us an opportunity to talk about many common threats, challenges that we have which you’ve identified, and particularly for us to be able to put into relief where we are.  Yesterday I had an extremely – I was part of an extremely useful meeting with the people from the Congress to come and talk about security matters.  Believe that the – madam, you were there, you were part of the meeting, and it’s significant for us.

And I think that beyond everything, there is a matter that I want to urge upon you.  Today, Russian mercenaries are on our northern border.  Burkina Faso has now entered into an arrangement to go along with Mali in employing the Wagner forces there.  I believe a mine in southern Burkina has been allocated to them as a form of payment for their services.  Prime minister of Burkina Faso in the last 10 days has been in Moscow.  And to have them operating on our northern border is particularly distressing for us in Ghana.

Apart from not accepting the idea of great powers once again making Africa their theater of operation, we have a particular position that you know about over the Ukraine war, where we have been very, very vocal and up front about condemning the invasion of Russia – by Russia.  And therefore, there now to have this group in our borders is a matter of some considerable disquiet and concern for us.  We’d really like to have a privileged opportunity to talk about its implications and what we believe ought to be the case.

This is what took place with the discussion in the Congress yesterday, which I found very fruitful.  And I would like to – the themes of that discussion should be the themes that we should continue to address: to what extent we can have you as a partner in confronting these threats.  It’s very important that ECOWAS and the West African area remains a democratic space.  It’s the reason for the actions we took over the coup d’etats in Burkina Faso, in Mali, and in Guinea.  ECOWAS has been very consistent in refusing to deal with these governments because of the undemocratic nature of their accession to power.

The commitment to democratic values and institutions is a high priority for our states.  We in Ghana have been through all kinds of arrangements, governance arrangements, in the past – one-party state, all kinds of experiments have taken place.  And our people are now very clear in their mind.  They want to go down the avenue of democratic engagement, and that is why the last 30 years of the Fourth Republic have been the most stable in our country’s history.  We want to do everything to preserve that, but there are enemies of democracy who are working hard in West Africa today.  And therefore it’s important that we bring that matter to your notice and see to what extent we can engage you as a reliable partner in the pushback of those forces.

There are other areas, of course, of great significance too – the cooperation for economic growth and – for the development and for the making of prosperity for our people, which is to some extent part and parcel of the same fight.  If the young people have things to do, they’re not going to be recruits for terrorist forces.  So all of that is part and parcel, but specifically, what we can do about the terrorist threat in West Africa is now the major security concern of all our states, especially the coastal states that, up till now, till the last six months, have been relatively free of this threat.  But now on all our common borders – Benin, Togo, Ghana, Cote D’Ivoire – are these forces that are operating there.  We have to find a way to be able to respond and respond effectively to protect our populations (inaudible).

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you, everyone.

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Mozambican President Nyusi

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 14, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi in Washington, D.C., during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Secretary Blinken and President Nyusi discussed shared global and regional priorities, including areas for cooperation during Mozambique’s first and historic UN Security Council term in 2023-2024. They also reaffirmed their strategic partnership to promote peace, stability, and global health security. Secretary Blinken highlighted how the U.S. Strategy to Prevent Conflict and Promote Stability complements important government and civil society efforts in northern Mozambique.

Secretary Blinken And Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi Before Their Meeting

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 14, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Good evening, everyone.  It’s a pleasure to welcome President Nyusi of Mozambique here to the State Department.  We are very much looking forward to our collaboration when Mozambique becomes a member of the United Nations Security Council in January, but we’re also strong partners – strong partners in helping Mozambique build stability, strong partners in building out global health together, dealing with food insecurity, and we really welcome that partnership.  There’s lots to discuss this evening, but Mr. President, thank you very much for being here, coming to the State Department, and for being in Washington this week for the summit.

PRESIDENT NYUSI:  Thank you.  Thank you also for the invitation to come here to join this forum, and also to have this small meeting with you.  We are here in your country really to try to (inaudible) our cooperation together.  And the – as you know very well, the investment from this country to my country, Mozambique (inaudible) very strong.  I had now – just now – meeting with ExxonMobil to try to discuss what we can do more.  And the Portuguese, together we have to discuss about the security of Mozambique – not only Mozambique, but Africa and all the world.  Thank you very much once again.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you, Mr. President.  Thank you, everyone.

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with President Saied of Tunisia

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with meets with Tunisian President Kais Saied in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with meets with Tunisian President Kais Saied in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 14, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony Blinken met today with Tunisian President Kais Saied in Washington, D.C. during the U.S.-Africa Leaders’ Summit. Secretary Blinken reiterated the United States’ deep commitment to Tunisian democracy and to supporting the aspirations of the Tunisian people for a democratic and prosperous future. The Secretary underscored strong U.S. support for Tunisia’s economy amid the current economic crisis exacerbated by Russia’s aggression in Ukraine. The Secretary stressed the historic nature of the longstanding U.S.-Tunisia bilateral relationship. Noting that this relationship is strongest when there is a shared commitment to democracy and human rights, Secretary Blinken emphasized the importance of free and fair December 17 parliamentary elections, as well as inclusive reforms to strengthen democratic checks and balances and the protection of fundamental freedoms.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with meets with Tunisian President Kais Saied in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with meets with Tunisian President Kais Saied in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary Antony J. Blinken and Tunisian President Kais Saied Before Their Meeting

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 14, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  It’s a great pleasure to be able to see the president of Tunisia, President Saied.  Mr. President, welcome.  Very good to have you here.  We have a longstanding partnership between the United States and Tunisia, the Tunisian people.  And it’s one to which the United States attaches great importance.

We have a broad agenda.  I’m grateful that the president is here.  We’ll no doubt be talking about our support for inclusive, transparent elections, the economic program that’s so important to the future of the Tunisian people, and we very much look forward to being able to work together in that direction and to make sure that the diverse voices in Tunisia are fully represented in its future.

But there’s a strong partnership between our countries, and a longstanding commitment of the United States to work in partnership with Tunisia.  Mr. President, thank you for being here today.  Thank you for being in Washington.

PRESIDENT SAIED:  (Via interpreter) I talked to you in the past in French when we talked on the phone.  Today, I cannot talk to you in French, given the presence of so many people here who can neither speak French or Arabic.  Therefore, we deal with all languages without any complaints. And among the proof of this is the Francophone summit that was held on the island of Djerba, and it met resounding success in Tunisia, and it does bear witness to the fact that Tunisia is a Mediterranean country and it has always remained, as usual, to entertain good relations with the northern shore of Europe and with its allies in the United States of America as well.

This is a good opportunity to talk about the authenticity of the bonds tying the two countries.  And yesterday, when I visited the Library of the Congress, I talked about the longstanding relations that exist between both countries.  I also talked about the recognition of Tunisia of the United States of America after the independence, and also I talked about the recognition of the United States Government of the Tunisian independence as one of the first countries.  And this is in addition to what the United States has done before that in supporting the independence of Tunisia.  And the visits have been so many to the United States ever since, where we have enjoyed huge support for the Tunisian independence after that.  We shall not forget this at all.

Tunisia did enjoy full support from the United States, especially in the areas of health and education, either directly from the United States Government or notably with the World Bank group, and also the USAID between the two countries.

It was a real revolution in Tunisia through education and through the entrusting by the state of the public – the major public services.  Indeed, we have the impact of this revolution at the level of education, at the level of health.  And when the public authorities were entrusted with the major commodities which are part and parcel of the human rights by the end of the day.  We also talked about the authentic relations that has existed ever since, and I have brought with me here a certain number of documents from Tunisia about the first American flag, how it was made to show how the countries are built and how the nations are built as well.  I also reiterated the preamble and American constitution, some short sentences, but quite meaningful to achieve the joy and the happiness of people.

And yesterday I talked about this.  And as the lady we met, the counselor for Social Security for President Jimmy Carter, he said, well, I’m not looking for the PNB, but we’re looking for the BNB, that is, the gross national happiness.  The words that we are looking for, the international – the gross international happiness, be it at the international or national levels.

For Tunisia, its international experience is quite authentic and deeply rooted in our history.  We had constitutions from Carthage to the fundamental pact in 1861, and the first constitution to be drafted in the Arab world and that dates back to 1861.  After that, we witnessed the era during which Tunisian nationals asked for constitution to guarantee the rights and liberties and to pave the way for the nation.  And this has been achieved eventually – after independence on the 1st of June 1959, more specifically.

And after the revolution and after the boom that Tunisia witnessed in 2010 and 2011, we have thought seriously of drafting constitution.  But the – unfortunately the constitution that was drafted, it was quite customized to serve the needs of a specific category.  It’s as if it was a garment or a pair of shoes, and that was the outcome of the election and the ballots that were adopted, which was the ballot on the list, by implementing the representative – the partial representativity and the biggest residue.  And as (inaudible) said in France when we adopted this kind of ballot system, he said that it is the ballot of shame.  We were voting in the dark, and nobody was aware of the outcome of these elections.

Unfortunately, rather than meeting the needs of the Tunisians at that time, and especially in economic and social terms – because there were some economic and social terms which are quite hard up to this very moment.  And things have also exacerbated.  And then we have also adopted constitution to serve the authority, and this has broken down, unfortunately, all of the political institutions.  More than that, we have a corruption that has exacerbated – let me mention here with regards to the low – related to the supreme – the constitutional court in Tunisia, the only voice in the assembly who was sold for 150,000 dinars – about 100,000 dollars – that’s for one seat, and there were a number – I say this to my friends who saw that to unveil the truth.  There were a number of MPs whose immunity has been lifted after the 25th of July.  They were members of the smuggling networks and they were deep involved in a moral crisis and issues.  This is in addition to the funds that were distributed on the occasion of making every rule, every project.

The economic situation, and the financial situation, and the corruption, and notably the blows that were dealt to the justice system, because the best way is legal and independent justice, but here, unfortunately, these people were involved in the courts.  And as one of the French writers said – here I’m talking about the French experience specifically, and he expressed himself in French – when the politics does of course come into the territory, justice would come out, and this – when the politicians would sit on the armchairs, people would exacerbate, and of course, (inaudible) would leave its premises and it’d be transformed into problems of retaliation and reprisals.  We wouldn’t like to be a court of retaliation or of reprisals, but we would like a court that is based on justice and equity.

And on several occasions, I use this opportunity to ask you to visit us in Carthage, Tunisia.  We did receive so many MPs in Carthage asking to dissolve the parliament.  One of them were bleeding in the front head, and about 10 – I don’t memorize the number, but many of them from the MPs, they were asking to dissolve the parliament.  This is in addition to the fact that the claims that came from the Tunisian nationals at that time wherever I went, they were all asking to dissolve the parliament.

So I eventually decided to dissolve the parliament.  That was not feasible for me because I would like to abide by the constitution that was adopted in 2014, so I decided to rather freeze the parliament at that time.  Why?  Because the country was on the brink of civil war all over the country, so I had no other alternative but to save the Tunisian nation from undertaking any nasty action.

And let me mention here that on the 24th of June, I – 2021 – I went to visit one of the cities, the city of Redeyef in the government of Gafsa in the south of – the southwest of Tunisia.  I went to see that, and it was hit by the COVID-19 that was widespread at that time.  I went to visit a public hospital.  In that hospital there was no water, and no electricity, and no oxygen.  This is on the 25th of July, and, of course, I was using the legal devices available at that time, but they were trying to buy out the harms and the illnesses of people, and, of course, the media were simply mentioning the number of victims on the 25th of July, and I was of course quite sad about this.  And I couldn’t even accept people to die in front of my eyes when other people are playing havoc with the Tunisian institutions.

So I took the decision on the basis of article 80 of the constitution of 2014 to freeze the action of the parliament, and I also invited the head of government – I told him I would like to be present on my side here to preserve your dignity.  But on the basis of the constitution, I have to take advice, so I took advice, the opinion of the speaker, because he was quite old.  And I phoned him so that – to avoid his moving to the palace.  That was 8:00 p.m.  So I told him that I’m going to use article 80 and dissolve the parliament, and to take some exceptional measures in this regard.

People took out to the street on that very night, on the 25th of July, 2011.  They were so happy and so joyful, as if they were getting rid of a real nightmare.  And the situations at that time remained as they are.  And what do these people did?  They organized a totally unacceptable decision by all standards.

(Ends in progress.)

Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha/
Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha/
Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha
Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha

Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha
Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman meets with Tanzanian Foreign Minister Stergomena Tax in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Ronny Przysucha

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation Scott Nathan delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Chief Executive Officer of the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation Scott Nathan delivers remarks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum Lunch in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with Zambian President Hakainde Hichilema in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with Zambian President Hakainde Hichilema in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a Millennium Challenge Corporation regional compact signing ceremony with Beninese President Patrice Talon and Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at a Congressional reception for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit on Capitol Hill on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at a Congressional reception for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit on Capitol Hill on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at a Congressional reception for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit on Capitol Hill on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at a Congressional reception for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit on Capitol Hill on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Democratic Republic of the Congo President Félix Tshisekedi in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Democratic Republic of the Congo President Félix Tshisekedi in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Democratic Republic of the Congo President Félix Tshisekedi in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Democratic Republic of the Congo President Félix Tshisekedi in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

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