February 2, 2023

Ethiopia, Ghana, Angola, Senegal, Niger, Djibouti, Guinea: Here are all bilateral meetings held at U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington December 13, 2022

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

The second US-Africa Leaders’ Summit ever kicked off in Washington DC on Tuesday with several bilateral meetings between United States and African nations. Below is a summary of what occurred on Tuesday, December 13, 2022.

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Ethiopian Prime Minister Ahmed

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 13, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed today to welcome progress made on the implementation of the November 2 Cessation of Hostilities Agreement, which is key to bringing lasting peace to northern Ethiopia. Secretary Blinken commended steps taken by the Ethiopian government to improve humanitarian access and begin restoration of essential services. The Secretary urged accelerated implementation of the agreement and access to the conflict areas by international human rights monitors.  Secretary Blinken and the Prime Minister also discussed the urgent need for all Eritrean forces to leave Ethiopia, which is to happen concurrently with disarmament of Tigrayan combatants.  The United States remains committed to supporting the African Union-led peace process, including the AU monitoring and verification mechanism.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Secretary Blinken And Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Before Their Meeting

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 13, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Good afternoon, everyone.  I’m very pleased to have Prime Minister Abiy here with us at the summit and in Washington.  We have, I think, a historic moment for the country, for Ethiopia, this agreement that is good news for the entire nation, as well as many other things that we’re working on together.  I’ve been very pleased, Mr. Prime Minister, to have (inaudible) conversations with you over the months, but it’s particularly good to see you in person here today.  Welcome.  Thank you.

PRIME MINISTER ABIY:  Thank you very much, Secretary Blinken.  (Inaudible.)

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon

United States Mission to the United Nations
Office of Press and Public Diplomacy
For Immediate Release
December 13, 2022

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo

United States Mission to the United Nations
Office of Press and Public Diplomacy
For Immediate Release
December 13, 2022

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo

The below is attributable to U.S. Mission to the United Nations Spokesperson Nate Evans:

U.S. Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield met today with Ghanaian President Nana Akufo-Addo and welcomed him to the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield thanked the president for Ghana’s strong partnership on the UN Security Council, including on issues such as the global impact of Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine. The Ambassador also asked for the president’s perspective on Security Council reform in light of the evolving dynamics of the international system. The Ambassador and the President discussed matters of security and governance in West Africa, including the role of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the development of the Accra Initiative.

Secretary Blinken and Secretary Austin’s Meeting with Angolan President Lourenço

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 13, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin met today with President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on the margins of the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit.  Secretary Blinken and Secretary Austin reiterated the importance the United States places on its relationship with Angola.  They expressed appreciation for Angola’s role as a regional leader, including President Lourenço’s efforts to bring peace to eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.  The Secretaries also noted our strong and increasing economic and security partnerships.  Secretary Blinken, Secretary Austin, and President Lourenço also discussed their shared priorities for the ongoing U.S-Africa Leaders Summit.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Angolan President João Lourenço in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/ Public
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/ Public

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with DRC President Tshisekedi

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 13, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:‎

Secretary Antony J. Blinken met today with Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) President Félix Tshisekedi to discuss the dire security and humanitarian situation in eastern DRC.  Secretary Blinken expressed his condolences for the lives lost in Kishishe and concern for the hundreds of thousands of displaced individuals.

Secretary Blinken and President Tshisekedi agreed on the importance of immediate implementation of the November 23 communiqué following the Luanda Mini-Summit on Peace and Security, namely a cessation of hostilities, the M23 armed group’s withdrawal, an end to state support to armed groups, condemnation of hate speech, and the resumption of consultations between the DRC government and domestic armed groups through the Nairobi Process.

The Secretary encouraged the Government of the DRC to speak out against hate speech and urged that it intensify efforts to condemn this unacceptable rhetoric.  The Secretary reinforced that any authorized cross-border military operations, bilateral and multilateral, should be deconflicted with MONUSCO and conducted in line with existing UN sanctions resolutions.  He commended President Tshisekedi’s willingness to engage in continued dialogue and his commitment to bringing peace and stability to the Congolese people.

Secretary Blinken’s Joint Meeting with Secretary Austin and President Guelleh of the Republic of Djibouti, President Bazoum of the Republic of Niger, and President Hassan Sheikh from the Federal Republic of Somalia

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 13, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J.Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin met today with President Mohamed Bazoum of the Republic of Niger, President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud of the Federal Republic of Somalia, and President Ismail Omar Guelleh of the Republic of Djibouti.

Secretary Blinken and Secretary Austin emphasized that the United States greatly values our partners’ continued leadership and sacrifices in support of regional security. The Secretaries welcomed the close partnership all three countries have with U.S. military forces and underscored that advancing peace and security requires a whole of government approach that includes good governance, economic growth and opportunity, and professional security forces that respect human rights.

Secretary Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin Before Meeting With Djiboutian President Ismaïl Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022.
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III meet with Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh, Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum, and Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022.

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 13, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, good morning, everyone.  A tout le monde, bienvenue, welcome.  Secretary Austin and I are delighted to have three close partners of the United States with us this morning: President Bazoum of the Republic of Niger, President Hassan Sheikh from the Federal Republic of Somalia, and, of course, President Guelleh from the Republic of Djibouti.  To all three of you, thank you, thank you for being here this morning and joining us.

We greatly value the strong relationship with these key partners as well as their continued engagement and leadership in support of African and regional security.  Their leadership – (break) – just simply to say how much we appreciate leadership across the board, including the work to resolve conflicts – (break) – well, simply put, we simply want to use this morning to continue building on the close partnership that we have to discuss in particular security cooperation and other shared priorities, including climate, health, education, food security.

(Via interpreter) We appreciate your participation and the partnership between our country and the leadership that you are showing in your continent.  Welcome.

SECRETARY AUSTIN:  Well, good morning, gentlemen.  It’s really great to see you.  We’re – as Secretary Blinken said, we’re happy to meet today to discuss our longstanding and effective security partnerships.  Our work together strengthens peace, security, and governance across Africa and beyond.

President Guelleh, we are especially grateful to Djibouti for hosting Camp Lemonnier.  That’s crucial for countering violent extremism and for supporting maritime security in the region.

President Bazoum, Niger has proven itself to be a willing and able partner in the fight against violent extremist organizations, and the United States is proud to support you and your Sahel Joint Force partners.

And President Sheikh Mohamud, the U.S. Department of Defense is fortunate to partner with Somalia’s courageous armed forces, and we’ll continue to support your government’s efforts as you further develop your security forces.

So we’re grateful for all of your countries’ robust cooperation with the United States.  Our partnerships contribute directly to many of the key goals in our National Defense Strategy, including defending our country, deterring aggression, and combating violent extremism.  And our partnerships are crucial to tackling transnational challenges that threaten us all, such as climate change and pandemics.

We’re all here today because we recognize that African leadership remains key to confronting our era’s defining challenges of peace, security, and governance, so we deeply appreciate your leadership and your friendship and look forward to continuing to build upon our important partnership.  So thank you very much, and it’s great to see you.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you, everyone.

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon

The below is attributable to U.S. Mission to the United Nations Spokesperson Nate Evans:

U.S. Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield met today with President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon and welcomed him to the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield acknowledged Gabon as a key partner on the UN Security Council, and thanked President Bongo for Gabon’s leadership on climate and environmental issues. The Ambassador and the President discussed regional efforts to resolve the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the cessation of hostilities in Ethiopia, and the international impact of Russia’s war in Ukraine.

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with Guinea Bissau President Umaro Sissoco Embaló

United States Mission to the United Nations
Office of Press and Public Diplomacy
For Immediate Release
December 13, 2022

Readout of Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s Meeting with Guinea Bissau President Umaro Sissoco Embaló

The below is attributable to U.S. Mission to the United Nations Spokesperson Nate Evans:

U.S. Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield met today with Guinea Bissau President Umaro Sissoco Embaló and welcomed him to the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. The Ambassador and President Embaló discussed matters of security and governance in West Africa in his purview as the chair of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), including the political transitions in Burkina Faso, Guinea, and Mali, and the destructive role of Wagner forces in the Sahel. Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield also shared her concern about the impact of Russia’s war in Ukraine on Africa and asked that African countries take a stand against an attack on the UN Charter.

Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Senegalese President Sall

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

READOUT

OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON

DECEMBER 13, 2022

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Senegalese President Macky Sall at the U.S.-African Leaders Summit in Washington, D.C., to reaffirm the strong bonds between the United States and Senegal.  The Secretary commended President Sall’s leadership as AU Chair during a challenging time for Africa and expressed U.S. support for AU efforts to address regional issues and food security challenges.  The Secretary and President discussed ways to deepen cooperation on climate change and agreed on the need for continued Senegalese leadership to bolster security, prosperity, and democratic governance in the region.

Secretary Blinken and Senegalese President and AU Chairperson Macky Sall Before Their Meeting

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Senegalese President and African Union Chairperson Macky Sall in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

REMARKS

ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Conservation, Climate Adaptation, and Just Energy Transition Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Conservation, Climate Adaptation, and Just Energy Transition Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER

WASHINGTON, D.C.

DECEMBER 13, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  It’s a great pleasure to really welcome a close friend and partner of the United States, the President of Senegal Macky Sall.  Mr. President, you were kind enough to welcome me in Dakar last November.  It’s a pleasure to be able to help reciprocate and have you here this week in Washington.

And Senegal has worked very closely with us to ensure the success of this summit.  We’re grateful for that.  I really want to commend your leadership both in Senegal itself but also in leadership of the African Union as the chair in what has been a very challenging year.  But I think the leadership that you’ve shown on dealing with everything from COVID to food insecurity has been important and made significant contributions to helping get through these dual challenges.

Senegal is a very strong partner with us on security cooperation, on building economic prosperity, confronting the climate crisis, dealing with a whole host of regional issues.  And so, Mr. President, today thank you for taking the time.  It’s very good to continue the conversation and the partnership that we have between us.  Welcome.

PRESIDENT SALL:  (Via interpreter) Thank you very much, honorable Secretary Blinken, my dear Antony.  It is a pleasure for me to meet you again.  And above all, allow me to congratulate President Biden for the second edition of the USA-Africa Leaders Summit in order to build bridges between Africa and the United States of America.

I would really like to commend the excellent level of bilateral cooperation between our two countries – exceptional, I should say, at all levels – and also commend the United States leadership on the major issues of the day at global level – peace and security and the role of the United States in the fight against the pandemic and the emerging challenges facing us, and also commend the cooperation in particular through the MCC, Millennium Challenge Corporation.  Senegal has signed a second compact, and we are currently focusing on the energy sector in order to (inaudible) bottlenecks to growth, fighting against poverty, in particular ensuring universal access and reforming the electricity sector.

But we have also come here to build and to make a new start with the United States on the issue of food security.  For Africa, following the pandemic and the war in Ukraine, we have seen how vulnerable Africa was.  What is at stake for us today is to have access to the grain market, to the fertilizer market.  I have no doubt that the United States will be able to help us access the market at conditions that are market conditions, i.e. fair prices.

This will not only help Africa, but beyond access to grain and fertilizers we also need to build a new agriculture, a new African agriculture that is resilient and based on technology, irrigation technology, investment.  And on all of these issues we have planned to have thorough discussion with our American counterparts.

I have already seen the draft declaration (inaudible) statement for this summit, which is very encouraging going forward, and we are fully supportive of it.  And we would also like to commend the historic position of President Biden, and I think he’ll confirm as much with regard to granting African Union a place at the G20.  And I think this will help build strong cooperation with Africa in a more dynamic way.  For the remainder of issues, we will probably be able to thrash them out tomorrow and look closer into the challenges ahead.

Thank you very much for hosting us.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Conservation, Climate Adaptation, and Just Energy Transition Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Conservation, Climate Adaptation, and Just Energy Transition Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

Executive Order on Establishing the President’s Advisory Council on African Diaspora Engagement in the United States

The White House
Presidential Actions
December 13, 2022

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to strengthen the dialogue between United States officials and the African Diaspora by elevating engagement through collaboration, partnership, and community-building among the United States, Africa, and other nations globally, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. The United States has a longstanding commitment to engagement with the African Diaspora — people of native African origin living outside the African continent, and who have been collectively described as constituting the sixth region of the African Union. The African Diaspora in the United States is a source of strength, and encompasses African Americans — including descendants of enslaved Africans — and nearly two million African immigrants who have close familial, social, and economic connections to the African continent. African Americans have been foundational to strengthening United States-Africa relations and in shaping United States foreign policy toward Africa — including by actively advocating on the African continent’s behalf, even as they struggled for civil rights in the United States. The African immigrant community continues to make significant contributions to America’s growth and prosperity. The United States Government encourages efforts to advance equity and opportunity for the African Diaspora in the United States, and will continue to encourage efforts to strengthen cultural, social, political, and economic ties between African communities, the global African Diaspora, and the United States.

In August 2022, my Administration released the U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa, which outlines our foreign policy objectives to bolster relations with African nations, listen to diverse local voices, and widen the circle of engagement to advance our strategic objectives for the benefit of both Africans and Americans.

Sec. 2. Establishment of the President’s Advisory Council on African Diaspora Engagement in the United States. Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Secretary of State shall establish the President’s Advisory Council on African Diaspora Engagement in the United States (Advisory Council) within the Department of State.

Sec. 3. Membership. (a) The Advisory Council shall consist of not more than 12 members, appointed by the Secretary of State, who are representatives of and reflect the diversity of the African Diaspora from African American and African immigrant communities, including individuals who have distinguished themselves in government, sports, creative industries, business, academia, social work, and faith-based activities. Appointments to the Advisory Council shall be made without regard to political affiliation.
(b) Members of the Advisory Council shall serve for 2-year terms without compensation or reimbursement.
(c) The Secretary of State shall designate one of the members of the Advisory Council to serve as Chair.
(d) The Secretary of State shall designate a senior officer or employee of the Department of State to serve as Executive Director of the Advisory Council.

Sec. 4. Functions. (a) The Advisory Council shall advise the President, through the Secretary of State, and then through the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (APNSA) and the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy (APDP), on strengthening connections between the United States Government and the African Diaspora in the United States, as described in the U.S. Strategy Toward Sub‑Saharan Africa.
(b) In providing the advice described in subsection (a) of this section, the Advisory Council shall provide information, analysis, and recommendations that address the following, in addition to other topics deemed relevant by the Secretary of State, in coordination with the APNSA and the APDP:
(i) strategies to advance equity and opportunity for African Diaspora communities, including through efforts coordinated by the Domestic Policy Council under Executive Order 13985 of January 20, 2021 (Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government);
(ii) ways to support the United Nations’ Permanent Forum on People of African Descent;
(iii) programs and initiatives to strengthen cultural, social, political, and economic ties between African communities, the global African Diaspora, and the United States, such as the Young African Leaders Initiative, and address challenges and opportunities to advance inclusion, belonging, and public awareness of the diversity, accomplishments, culture, and history of the African Diaspora;
(iv) programs and initiatives, such as the International Visitor Leadership Program, to expand educational exchange programs between Africa and the United States;
(v) programs and initiatives to increase public- and private-sector collaboration and community involvement in improving the socioeconomic well‑being of African Diaspora communities; and
(vi) programs and initiatives, such as Prosper Africa, to increase participation of members of the African Diaspora in the United States with regard to trade, investment, economic growth, and development programs relating to Africa.

Sec. 5. Administration. (a) The Department of State shall provide funding and administrative support for the Advisory Council, to the extent permitted by law and within existing appropriations.
(b) The Advisory Council shall meet in plenary session on a quarterly basis, at a minimum, or more frequently as necessary.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.) (the “Act”), may apply to the Advisory Council, any functions of the President under the Act, except for those in section 6 of the Act, shall be performed by the Secretary of State in accordance with the guidelines issued by the Administrator of General Services.
(b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(c) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(d) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

Vice President Harris Announces New Investment in Young African Leaders Initiative

United States Agency for International Development
Press Release
December 13, 2022

Today, at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington, D.C., Vice President Kamala Harris announced plans to work with Congress to fund a U.S. government investment of more than $100 million in the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI).

As part of this expansion and in collaboration with partners, USAID will create the Young African Leaders Exchange, the first pan-African virtual platform that will enable the Diaspora and other key stakeholders to connect directly with nearly 28,000 YALI alumni from 49 sub-Saharan countries since YALI was launched in 2010. The Exchange will promote networking, strengthen the role of mentors and coaches, showcase initiatives, enhance women and marginalized youth’s leadership, and support young African leaders to access grant or internship opportunities.

The additional funding will expand YALI’s training and mentoring of young African women and men with leadership skills to generate transformational change in their communities, countries, and continent. These funds will also enable YALI to harness the support of the private sector, African Diaspora, and governments to increase economic opportunities, digital connectivity, gender equality, women’s empowerment, and social inclusivity, and empower young African leaders working in business and entrepreneurship, public management, and civic leadership.

The new investment will also facilitate the first pan-African YALI Alumni Expo and Trade Show, which will feature the innovations of alumni and foster their connection with experts and officials from the private sector, civil society, government, and the Diaspora community.

Launched in 2010, the Young African Leaders Initiative has demonstrated how providing skill sets to individuals can change lives and address challenges in communities and countries across the African continent. For more information on USAID’s Young African Leaders Initiative, visit www.usaid.gov/yali

Private Sector Partnerships Support the African and Diaspora Young Leaders Forum

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
December 13, 2022

The Department of State’s Office of Global Partnerships announces three partnerships with private sector partners to collaborate on the African and Diaspora Young Leaders Forum , part of the larger U.S. Africa Leaders Summit . These partners, African Diaspora Network, Atlantic Council’s Africa Center, and Netflix are leveraging their expertise to support the Forum’s theme of “Amplifying Voices: Building Partnerships that Last”.

  • The Department of State is partnering with the African Diaspora Network, with support from the Gates Foundation, to co-host a high-level working lunch focused on channeling diaspora remittances into productive investments in Africa.
  • The Department of State is partnering with the Atlantic Council, with support from the Open Society Foundation, to co-host a networking breakfast highlighting and exhibiting artists and creatives from throughout the continent. U.S. companies Meta and Google will use their innovative technologies to showcase these creatives.
  • The Department of State is partnering with Netflix in collaboration with UNESCO to host a screening and panel discussion of one of the winners of their ‘African folktales, reimagined’ short film competition.

The Department of State’s Office of Global Partnerships welcomes our collaboration with these partners and looks forward to a fruitful African and Diaspora Young Leaders Forum. To learn more about the Office of Global Partnerships and our current initiatives, please click here or visit https://www.state.gov/s/partnerships.

For broader press inquiries regarding the Summit, please contact SummitMedia@state.gov.

Remarks by Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Wally Adeyemo at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit’s African and Diaspora Young Leaders Forum

U.S. Department of Treasury
Press Release
December 13, 2022

As Delivered

Thank you all so much for joining us today. My name is Wally Adeyemo, and I am the Deputy Secretary of the United States Treasury.

I want to thank the President of Ghana for being here today and for his efforts to strengthen the African Diaspora community. The success of Ghana’s Year of Return in 2019 is an inspiring example of how to draw on the United States’ large and engaged diaspora communities to build closer ties between Ghana, Africa more broadly and the United States.

For me, a number of my friends had an opportunity to go to the continent for the first time during the year of the return and to think about their role and their relationship with the continent that we have all come from. The Diaspora’s role in shaping American society and culture, and the way its members contribute to the dynamism of our economy are themes that are deeply personal to me. The story of the African American diaspora is one that is part of my story. My parents, although they raised me in Southern California, came to this country with me in hand, immigrating here from Nigeria. And while they brought me from Nigeria, like many African stories, they touched on many different countries in their journey in Africa, growing up in Ghana, I’m oftentimes in our house, we had Kenkey for dinner, at the same time that you would have foods from Nigeria. So it spoke to the diversity of experiences that Africans bring to this country all the time. And I think that bringing that perspective to the Treasury Department, where I have the ability to serve the American people, as to the rich legacy of this country as well, a country built on immigration, and the contributions the members of the Diaspora make here big and small matter greatly to the United States economy and to our culture.

But the Diaspora also contributes to Africa, a Brookings study estimating that the Diaspora last year contributed $46 billion in remittances to Africa. And beyond the economic contribution, the People-to-people engagement creates ties that imbued this country and Africa with deep knowledge and a shared sense of common aspirations.

Strengthening this community at forums like this one allow us to cement and deepen these ties. In doing so, we exchange openly and freely about challenges – and I am aware of the multiple shocks facing African countries today – and it’s something that we should speak about openly and transparently.

As all of you know, I am not the most senior person to serve in the U.S. government from the African Diaspora. I had an opportunity to work for President Obama, both in his administration but also helping to run his foundation. And part of what all of us know, as young leaders in the African Diaspora, which I consider myself part of this community, is that critical to our abilities to succeed is being able to see ourselves and leaders who have come before us. Finding the type of mentors and examples that have blazed a path for us. And today, I have the ability to introduce one of those mentors for me, one of those leaders who have blazed a path that has allowed me to be in the role that I’m in today, and that is Vice President of the United States Kamala Harris.

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Secretary Blinken At the Conservation, Climate Adaptation, and Just Energy Transition Forum

Remarks
Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Washington, D.C.
December 3, 2022

SECRETARY BLINKEN: Well, thank you. Good afternoon, everyone, and a big thank you, Hayde, to you for keeping us moving, and I will try to stay on your good side. (Laughter.) But it’s an honor to be joined at this table by so many leaders, so many colleagues – among other, President Tshisekedi – it’s very good to be with you – President Ramkalawan, President Hichilema, President Buhari, President Obiang, President Bongo Ondimba – thank you, thank you, thank you for your partnership, for your partnership to help preserve our planet.

We’re also joined today by members of Congress, members of the Biden Cabinet – I think Congressman Meeks is about to join us if he’s not already here – we have representatives from multilateral organizations, philanthropies, private sector leaders, activists, academics, youth leaders. To each and every one of you, welcome.

The diversity of this group is heartening – a statement not merely of how we’re all affected by the climate crisis, but how committed we all are to working together to address it.

Last month many of us were in Egypt for COP27. An African COP was a recognition that, as the urgency of the climate crisis grows, our focus must increasingly be on Africa.

As we know, 17 of the world’s 20 most climate vulnerable countries are on the African continent.

Four straight years of drought in the Horn of Africa have left more than 18 million people facing severe hunger.

Communities across the continent are feeling the impact of a changing climate. Severe storms have battered southern Africa; surging temperatures kindle wildfires in northern Africa; rising seas threaten lives and livelihoods on island nations, while extreme weather events in central Africa worsen already-dire food crises and fuel tensions that feed and fuel violent conflict.

We know that African nations have contributed relatively little to this crisis but are disproportionally harmed by it. It’s both unfair and unrealistic to ask them to turn their backs on economic development and opportunity in the name of a clean energy transition, to ask them in effect to forego what many of us have done in the past in developing our countries and our economies.

And so we believe that the best way – indeed, the just way – to address the climate crisis in Africa is to work together.

Earlier this year, in South Africa, I had an opportunity to set out President Biden’s new Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa. It’s based on a simple idea: we can’t achieve any of our shared priorities – tackle any of our biggest challenges – unless we do it together as equal partners.

That’s true of every major issue we face today, and it’s particularly true of climate change. So here’s how we’re addressing this crisis together.

First, we are partnering to conserve ecosystems. Africa is home to some of the world’s most precious ecosystems, which are critical for combating climate change. This summer I visited the Democratic Republic of Congo, where forests absorb more carbon than is emitted by the entire continent of Africa. The Congo Basin is also a place of tremendous biodiversity, a lifeforce for agriculture across the region.

To support the sustainable management of the Congo Basin rainforest, we’ve invested over $600 million in the Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment, which brings together the U.S. Government and African and U.S. NGOs.

And we’re building new coalitions between African governments, the private sector, civil society to protect other vital ecosystems across the continent.

Oceans are also a key part of this fight. That’s why we’ve launched the Ocean Conservation Pledge to encourage countries to commit to protect at least 30 percent of their ocean waters by the year 2030.

Second, we’re partnering to make commitments and communities more resilient in the face of climate change. The President’s Emergency Plan for Adaptation and Resilience is working with national governments to help more than half a billion people in developing countries manage the impacts of climate change. This and other initiatives to support climate-resilient agriculture are increasingly critical as Russia’s war of aggression compounds the impact on food security.

At COP, the President also announced a doubling of our pledged contributions to the Adaptation Fund, which has deployed nearly $1 billion to help over 36 million people in the most vulnerable communities around the world. And we committed to begin discussions on loss and damage funding arrangements to support low- and middle-income countries.

Third, we’re partnering to advance a just transition to a clean energy economy that both saves our planet and fosters inclusive economic opportunity.

Africa will be at the center of the clean energy transition. Its renewable energy potential is second to none. It’s home to roughly a third of all critical minerals, essential to the technology that will power the clean energy economy, like batteries for renewable energy storage and wind turbines. But with nearly half of Sub-Saharan Africa’s population lacking reliable access to electricity and the population set to grow to more than two billion people by 2050, how that transition is made will be decisive in shaping our future climate.

The United States will work closely with African countries as they determine how best to meet their specific energy needs – understanding that, for many, the clean energy transition will be a transition to consistent, reliable energy in the first place. We’ll do so through programs like Power Africa, which has mobilized the public and private sectors to deliver cleaner, more reliable electricity to over 165 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa who previously didn’t have access. We’re proud to announce a new investment of $290 million in that program.

Too often, those who are most vulnerable to the impacts of these changes have been denied a seat at the decision-making table. We’re committed to changing that, including through the new Accelerating Women’s Empowerment in Energy project, which is making sure that women have a say in how their countries move forward on clean energy.

All of these efforts recognize that combating the climate crisis, like so many other challenges we face, was actually championed by Africans in the first place. Indeed, in Africa, we see not only the stakes of this crisis, but also the solutions. Gabon has led the way in conserving its forest resources, which now absorb 140 million tons of CO2 every year. That’s the equivalent of taking 30 million cars off the road.

The Seychelles has pioneered the world’s first sovereign blue bond to marshal public and private investment for sustainable marine and fisheries projects. It’s on the way to conserving 30 percent of its ocean waters – that’s an area the size of Zimbabwe – by 2030.

Zambia is harnessing the power of its wetlands and forests to mitigate climate impacts, benefiting tens of thousands of people vulnerable to both floods and to droughts.

Nigeria has set bold targets and robust regulations for methane reductions – the first country in Africa to do so – which could reduce air pollutants by a third and avert tens of thousands of deaths.

Equatorial Guinea just raised its commitment to cut emissions by 35 percent by 2030. And the DRC has hosted the pre-COP27 meetings in Kinshahsa. It’s teaming up with the United States on a broad scope of these issues through our Sustainable Development Solutions Working Group.

Today, and throughout this summit over the course of this week, I look forward to hearing from this group on how we can most effectively deepen our partnership to the benefit of all of our people, and indeed to the benefit of people around the world. And I look forward to continuing this conversation in the months and also the years to come. This is an enduring project for all of us, but I think we also all feel the fierce urgency of now. And that determination is reflected in so much of the work that is being done and is being represented in this room.

With that, it is a pleasure and honor to turn the floor over to President Tshisekedi to offer some remarks. Mr. President, the floor is now yours.

Readout of the African Growth and Opportunity Act Ministerial During the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit

Office of the United States Trade Representative
Readout
Washington
December 13, 2022

United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai and Deputy United States Trade Representative Sarah Bianchi hosted trade ministers from sub-Saharan Africa for the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Ministerial during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit.

The Ministerial re-affirmed the United States’ commitment to expanding trade and investment with the continent and highlighted the broad agreement on the need to strengthen implementation and modernize AGOA to translate opportunity into concrete benefits for the African people. Leading trade officials in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Biden-Harris Administration exchanged perspectives on core issues impacting our trade relationship, including the future of AGOA.

Ambassador Tai thanked the ministers for a productive and candid discussion about the issues that are central to the U.S.-Africa trade and investment relationship. She emphasized the need to think creatively and build on the accomplishments of AGOA by developing ideas that will drive economic integration and investment across the continent. Ambassador Tai also convened a plenary session with trade ministers and a bipartisan group of members of Congress on the House Ways and Means and Foreign Affairs Committees who discussed their support for deepening the U.S. – Africa trade and investment ties.

AGOA was enacted in 2000 and has since been at the core of U.S. trade and investment policy with sub-Saharan Africa. AGOA provides eligible sub-Saharan African countries with duty-free access to the U.S. economy and has helped drive investment on the continent, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs, promoting regional integration and enhancing Africa’s export competitiveness. It has also incentivized many African governments to undertake key political and economic reforms.

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Strengthening the U.S.-Africa Partnership in Space

The White House
Statements and Releases
December 13, 2022

On December 13, 2022, the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit featured the first-ever U.S.-Africa Space Forum. The Forum reaffirmed the United States’ commitment to collaborating with African partners on the peaceful use and exploration of outer space to meet shared priorities for here on Earth. The Forum highlighted the U.S.-Africa space partnership and cooperation to address 21st century challenges and opportunities, including responding to the climate, biodiversity, and global food crises; promoting responsible behavior in outer space; and reinforcing U.S.-African scientific and commercial space cooperation. Participants in the Forum committed to deepening the U.S.-Africa space partnership across all sectors.

The Forum celebrated the signing of the Artemis Accords by Nigeria and Rwanda, making them the first African signatories. The Artemis Accords are a set of principles to guide the next phase in space exploration, reinforcing and providing for important operational implementation of key obligations in the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. The Accords affirm the importance of implementing best practices and norms of responsible behavior as well as compliance with the Registration Convention and the Rescue and Return Agreement.

Professor Isa Ali Ibrahim, Minister of Communications and Digital Economy, signed the Artemis Accords on behalf of Nigeria, while Francis Ngabo, CEO of Rwanda Space Agency, signed the Accords on behalf of Rwanda. They were joined on the U.S. side by Assistant Secretary of State Monica Medina, Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Bill Nelson, and Executive Secretary of the National Space Council, Chirag Parikh. With their signatures, 23 nations have signed the Artemis Accords.

The Forum also discussed the role of the private sector in supporting U.S.-Africa space partnership. A number of U.S. companies have recently announced new investments in the U.S.-Africa partnership, including:

  • The Rwanda Space Agency and ATLAS Space Operations have partnered to bring a teleport and large satellite antenna to the global space community.
  • Planet Labs PBC is investing across Africa with a range of stakeholders to deliver daily satellite imagery and geospatial solutions that help meet sustainability, economic, and resource management priorities, including supporting decision making on drought risk protection, forest management, and renewable energy. Kenyan company ZEP-RE just announced that it will use Planet’s satellite imagery as it works with the World Bank on drought risk protection in the Horn of Africa. In furtherance of Nigeria’s goal of providing all of its citizens broadband access by 2025, Nigeria announced that SpaceX’s high-speed, low latency broadband service Starlink is now available in the country, making Nigeria the first country in Africa where Starlink is available.
  • Zipline is drawing upon space data to expand its aerial logistics services to more government sectors in Rwanda, including the health, agriculture, finance, e-commerce and tourism divisions, and will conduct nearly two million instant deliveries across Rwanda by 2029.

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Remarks For Assistant Secretary Medina U.S.-Africa Space Forum, December 13, 2022

Nigeria and Rwanda: First African Nations Sign the Artemis Accords

Remarks
Office of the Spokesperson
December 13, 2022

Good morning. Thank you to Executive Secretary Chirag Parikh and the U.S. National Space Council for inviting me to speak today. President Biya, Minister of Communications and Digital Economy Isa Ali Ibrahim, Chief Executive Officer Francis Ngabo, Administrator Nelson… distinguished guests and colleagues … it’s wonderful to be here with all of you as we mark the first day of the U.S.-Africa Leaders’ Summit.

We’re here to talk about U.S.-Africa cooperation in outer space, but I want to start closer to home. Back in 2005, when Hurricane Katrina made landfall in New Orleans, U.S. disaster response coordinators urgently needed satellite imagery to understand the scale of the damage. The first images to arrive that day were not from a U.S. government satellite—they came from NigeriaSat-1, which as the name suggests was Nigerian-owned—and they showed the full extent of flooding in New Orleans and all along the Louisiana coastline.

As we enter this new era in space development, it’s important to remember the tangible benefits that space partnership can deliver for our citizens… and that African nations are not just recipients of those benefits, but active participants and partners in the exploration and use of space. As we focus this week on further strengthening the 21st century U.S.-Africa partnership, space can and will play a key role… with implications for our scientific, environmental, and economic cooperation.

For all those reasons and more, today is a celebratory occasion. We are so delighted to welcome Nigeria and Rwanda as the first two African nations to sign the Artemis Accords.

The 23 Artemis Accords signatories represent a diverse set of nations with a wide range of space capabilities and interests. The Accords support our activities in NASA’s Artemis program, which aims to land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon, among other objectives. Through the Artemis program, the United States is building the broadest and most diverse international human space effort in human history.

As we expand our cooperation and capabilities in outer space, we must commit to doing so responsibly. That’s why the Artemis Accords focus on peaceful space exploration. It’s also why Vice President Harris announced in April the United States’ commitment NOT to conduct direct-ascent, anti-satellite missile tests. These tests jeopardize the long-term sustainability of outer space by damaging the space environment, and they endanger the use of space by all nations. We appreciate the strong support of the African Group nations in the UN General Assembly for the U.S.-sponsored resolution which underscores this commitment.

When we commit to safe, peaceful, and sustainable exploration and use of space, we can unlock its limitless potential.

Today, you’ll hear about how our collective efforts in outer space can help combat climate change and advance progress toward achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

You’ll also hear more about space-based Earth observation technology, which deepens our understanding of our home planet. For example, in the United States space-based observations help wildfire-prone regions contain damage, saving lives and minimizing economic losses. Just last month, Uganda and Zimbabwe launched their first Earth observation satellites, which will perform analyses of water quality, land use cover, and soil fertility. We look forward to partnering with African nations on future applications for space-based Earth-observation.

And of course, space cooperation has huge economic potential as well. Last year, the Space Foundation valued the space economy at $469 billion, most of which was generated by the commercial sector. The rapid expansion of the commercial space industry has created new opportunities for public-private partnerships that support economic growth and advance space science. It seems like hardly a week passes by without a new launch or a new landmark achievement. I have no doubt that African countries will be major contributors to those efforts in the years ahead.

Today, Nigeria and Rwanda are in the spotlight, and we are very excited to welcome them to the Artemis Accords. We hope to see more African nations here at the signing table soon, and we welcome all who wish to join our efforts to develop a safe, peaceful, and sustainable outer space. Because at their core, our efforts in outer space serve to improve the lives of people in the United States, on the African continent, and indeed throughout the world.

Thanks again for joining us today.

Innovators Gathering: Secretary Blinken Convenes U.S. and African Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Philanthropists Ahead of U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
December 13, 2022

About 250 entrepreneurs, investors, and celebrities participated in the investment-focused Innovators Gathering, honoring the influx of two-way investment and trade opportunities set to be announced at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit.

The Innovators Gathering: Investing in U.S.-Africa Cultural and Economic Ties was hosted on December 12 by the Secretary of State, the Department of State’s Office of Global Partnerships, and the Prosper Africa initiative. The event was presented in collaboration with the Tony Elumelu Foundation, with support from Google. Attendees included Idris Elba, Yvonne Orji, Tony Elumelu, New York City Mayor Eric Adams, Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, and more – with virtual remarks from former President Barack Obama. Participants convened to celebrate and catalyze partnerships between U.S. investors and African and Diaspora innovators, influencers, and entrepreneurs.

The evening included a panel discussion moderated by Special Representative for Global Partnerships Dorothy McAuliffe with panelists including Dr. A.V. Elumelu and Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurs on “The Power of Investing in Africa”, a pitch competition featuring dynamic African entrepreneurs, and a reception hosted by Secretary of State Antony Blinken and catered by celebrity chef and entrepreneur Pierre Thiam.

The gathering highlighted the integral role public-private partnerships play in bolstering trade and investment between the U.S. and African nations, which advances diplomacy and creates growth, opportunity, and employment. Special guest Tony Elumelu said he was honored to be among the group of leaders who were building the African and American social and economic landscape, while James Manyika, Senior Vice President of Technology and Society at Google, said that the company is excited to work with U.S. and African leaders from the public and private sectors to support African-led innovation and the people and businesses powering it.

The event launched the week of President Joe Biden’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, held from December 13 – 15, by highlighting the United States’ longstanding commitment to Africa and the investment ecosystem they share.

For more information visit: https://www.state.gov/africasummit/.

To learn more about the Office of Global Partnerships and our current initiatives, please click here or visit https://www.state.gov/s/partnerships. You may also email Partnerships@state.gov for more information.

State Department Announces Partnership Opportunity Delegation to Ghana

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
December 13, 2022

On December 12, 2022, Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken announced an upcoming Partnership Opportunity Delegation (POD) to Accra, Ghana. The delegation will travel to Accra February 6-10, 2023, to cultivate and enable collaboration and partnership opportunities between the U.S. private sector and West Africa’s burgeoning climate innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem. The Secretary made the announcement during the Innovators Gathering pre-summit event for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. The announcement underscores the steps the United States and African nations are taking to strengthen partnerships that advance shared priorities.

PODs are organized by the U.S. Department of State’s Office of Global Partnerships (GP) to facilitate partnership activities between the public and private sectors of the United States and selected countries. POD Ghana 2023 will be the first in-person POD since the beginning of the pandemic, and delegates will include representatives from ventures and startups, educational institutions, startup ecosystem developers, climate and sustainable technology investors, Ghanaian diaspora, NGOs, and international organizations. Numerous organizations have already committed to joining the POD, including Climate Kic, New York City’s Impact Hub, Arm, LinkedIn, and more.

As part of the Connecting Climate Entrepreneurs (CCE) initiative, POD Ghana 2023 aims to cultivate new engagement between the vibrant technology and innovation corridors of the United States and Ghana through public-private partnerships and supports the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit’s goals of fostering new economic development and responding to the climate crisis. Delegates will take part in facilitated introductions to Ghana’s public and private sector leaders, engage directly with climate innovators, and witness firsthand the potential promise and challenges of collaboration with Ghana’s sustainable entrepreneurship ecosystem. POD Ghana 2023 demonstrates how the public and private sectors can contribute jointly to endeavors that strengthen, deepen, and reaffirm United States’ commitment to increasing creative collaboration with Africa nations in advancement of our shared global priorities, challenges, and opportunities.

CCE is a public-private partnership between the Department of State’s Office of Global Partnerships and private sector entities to leverage the U.S. entrepreneurial ecosystem to advance climate entrepreneurship worldwide. CCE was launched in collaboration with LinkedIn, Salesforce, and General Electric in 2021 at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland.

For further information, please contact the Office of Global Partnerships at partnerships@state.gov, visit https://www.state.gov/s/partnerships, or follow @GPatState on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. For media inquiries, please contact Melanie Bonner at partnerships@state.gov.

Secretary Blinken at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum

Remarks
Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Washington, D.C.
December 3, 2022

MS FRAZER: Secretary Blinken, you have been at the forefront at calling for a shift from reactive and often crisis-driven security approaches in Africa to collaborative and sustainable strategies. President Bazoum has discussed how Niger is confronting immediate and serious threats from terrorism, climate, and extreme poverty while simultaneously safeguarding the long-term future of his country. Can you speak to the linkage between building and sustaining democratic institutions and good governance and realizing long-term peace and prosperity? What could be practically done through U.S. partnerships, sir?

SECRETARY BLINKEN: Jendayi, thank you very, very much. And first, it’s really an honor to share this platform with the three presidents and also with my friend the chairman, Chairman Faki. They are each evidence of the difference that leadership can make in tackling these challenges. And really, I want to pick up from where Lloyd left off and also reflect on some of the things that I heard our colleagues say and that I took note of.

Look, I think the link between actually having sustainable peace and sustainable opportunity and development, good governance and institutions, is very clear. The real question is how to get there and how to get there in effect when, as our friend from Niger has said, you’re trying to do it while you’re flying the plane at 60,000 feet. And you’re trying to do it at a time when virtually all of the challenges we face are interconnected and unfortunately reinforcing each other. And you just heard Lloyd talk about this and others talk about this, whether it is the combination of climate, food insecurity, energy insecurity that in different ways drive migration, drive fights over resources, drive conflict – all of these things reinforcing each other.

The challenge for governance is to be able to deal with them effectively in the moment, but at the same time get the balance right so that we’re also dedicating resources, time, and attention to trying to build a stronger foundation – a stronger foundation of good governance, of strong institutions, of development, not simply emergency humanitarian response. That’s what makes peace sustainable. That’s what makes opportunity real.

So I think one of the things that we’re driving at, as we’re thinking about this with our African colleagues, is how do we do this more effectively in partnership with Africa. You heard the Secretary of Defense say this: the solutions that are made just in the United States are not likely to be sustainable. We’re focused on listening to our partners: What are their needs? What are local requirements? How do we build together on that basis? That’s one critically important thing, and it animates everything we’re doing.

Second, we’re looking at making genuine investments because, again, a response to the immediate is necessary, but it is insufficient and it’s not a long-term solution. We’re dealing now with a massive food insecurity crisis. It’s the product of a lot of things, as we all know. It’s the product of climate change. It’s the product of COVID. It’s a product, unfortunately, of conflict, including Russia’s aggression against Ukraine. And so we have an immediate emergency response, especially as we’re looking at historic, alas, droughts in different places. We’re looking at famine conditions in a number of countries, and the United States has been leading the way on that.

But what I have heard time and again, especially talking to African colleagues – we brought together leaders from around the world back in May at the Security Council, when we were in the presidency of the Security Council, and focused on food insecurity. And in a session that I had with African colleagues the thing I heard again and again and again is, yes, we need to address the emergency situation, but what we want even more is a genuine investment in our own productive capacity and our own self-sufficiency. So that’s driving, for example, the Feed the Future program that we have. It’s driving a lot of the work that we’re doing around the world.

Same thing on global health. We’ve been – we’ve gone through this pandemic, and what we know from that is it’s insufficient simply to deal with the immediate challenge. We have to help put in place – and have to help Africa put in place – the foundations to be able to deal with that themselves going forward, so that there’s not a reliance on others to build the productive capacity. So we’ve helped establish, from South Africa to Senegal, the capacity to, for example, produce vaccines in Africa for Africans.

We’re investing in young people. As everyone knows, the majority of the population in Africa is young. We have been going back to initiatives that President Obama started invested in young African leaders. There are now 700,000 young Africans who are part of the YALI Network virtually. It’s incredibly powerful because it’s building connections between them, among them, and building out partnerships for the future. A big piece of this is the investments we’re making in women and girls, something we can talk about at greater length.

And then finally, I would say that there’s no one model of good governance. There’s no one model for how to build strong institutions. I think we have to be informed by each other. We have to be informed by local conditions, local needs. And from the perspective of the United States, this is also not about a competition with others. This is not about saying to our friends and partners you have to choose. This is about offering a genuine choice, offering a genuine partnership, and hopefully together building a race to the top, not a race to the bottom. That’s what we’re animated by. We put out a Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa a few months ago, and it really does bring together the three pieces that are represented here.

The last thing I’ll say is this. It’s interesting, when you’re in the Situation Room, as you know very well, oftentimes the diplomats are saying gosh, we could use a little bit more defense and security or a little bit more development, and then the secretary of defense is saying we need some more diplomacy to deal with this. And so we’re constantly playing off of each other, but it’s really increasingly in response to what we’re hearing from our friends, from our colleagues, from our partners. That’s what animating us. That’s the only way I think we’re going to be successful in building this plane as our friends are flying it at 60,000 feet.

MS FRAZER: Yes. Thank you very much, Secretary Blinken, and thank you very much for putting the emphasis on the quality of the partnership, the content of that partnership, the nature of that partnership, and what the United States is doing to build it with all of Africa.

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participates in a memorandum of understanding signing ceremony with Democratic Republic of the Congo Foreign Minister Christophe Lutundula and Zambian Foreign Minister Stanley Kakubo in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett
Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken delivers remarks at the Peace, Security, and Governance Forum in Washington, D.C. on December 13, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett

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