April 22, 2024

New York City Aims to Reduce Food-Based Emissions by 33 Percent by 2030

Mayor Adams Commits to Reducing City’s Food-Based Emissions by 33 Percent by 2030 After Releasing new Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Incorporating Emissions From Food
Mayor Adams Commits to Reducing City’s Food-Based Emissions by 33 Percent by 2030 After Releasing new Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Incorporating Emissions From Food

New York City Mayor Eric Adams and Chief Climate Officer and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Rohit T. Aggarwala announced on Monday the release of the city’s first integrated greenhouse gas inventory, incorporating emissions from food production and consumption. The inventory, developed by the Mayor’s Office of Climate & Environmental Justice (MOCEJ), reveals that food emissions represent 20 percent of the city’s overall emissions, making it the third largest source behind buildings (34 percent) and transportation (22 percent).

In response to the new inventory, Mayor Adams and Mayor’s Office of Food Policy (MOFP) Executive Director Kate MacKenzie announced the city’s commitment to reducing food-based emissions by 33 percent by 2030. The city will focus on reducing absolute carbon emissions from food purchases across its city agencies.

“New York City is leading the world when it comes to combating climate change, because we’re using every option on the menu in our fight — and that includes changing our menus, too,” said Mayor Adams. He highlighted the city’s plant-based meal initiatives in public hospitals and the introduction of Plant-Powered Fridays in public schools as examples of the city’s ongoing efforts to reduce food emissions. Mayor Adams also challenged the private sector to reduce their food emissions by 25 percent by 2030.

Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services Anne Williams-Isom emphasized the health benefits of plant-based meals and their positive impact on the environment. Chief Climate Officer and DEP Commissioner Aggarwala expressed his enthusiasm for the inventory’s new insights into food’s role in greenhouse gas emissions. MOCEJ Executive Director Kizzy Charles-Guzman and MOFP Executive Director MacKenzie both stressed the importance of transparency, bold policies, and behavior change in achieving the city’s climate goals.

New York City’s commitment to reducing food-based emissions reflects its broader strategy for combating climate change and its ongoing efforts to promote sustainable practices in both the public and private sectors.

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