Religious freedom in Ghana

GHANA 2020 INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM REPORT
Executive Summary


The constitution prohibits religious discrimination, stipulates that individuals are
free to profess and practice their religion, and does not designate a state religion.

Registration is required for religious groups to have legal status. On March 15, the government restricted public gatherings, including for in-person worship, as a
measure to combat COVID-19. While most Christian and Muslim leaders advised
their communities to follow the directive, a minority, primarily composed of small,
independent churches, complained that the ban on large gatherings infringed upon
religious liberties, and some defied the decrees by gathering for worship.

President
Nana Akufo-Addo lifted the ban on July 31. The President moved forward with
plans for an interdenominational national Christian cathedral, but opposition to the
proposal for the new cathedral continued.

Muslim and Christian leaders continued to emphasize the importance of religious
freedom and tolerance and reported communication and coordination among
themselves on a wide array of matters.

Religious institutions played a key role in
providing vulnerable citizens a social safety net, including during the COVID-19
pandemic. Religious leaders generally praised the government for consulting with
religious institutions on those measures.

U.S. embassy representatives discussed with government officials the importance
of mutual understanding, religious tolerance, and respect for all religious groups.
Embassy officers discussed religious freedom and tolerance with religious leaders,
including engagement with the National Peace Council and Regional Peace
Councils, whose governing councils include prominent religious leaders. In April,
the Ambassador published a Ramadan message recognizing interfaith engagement,
cooperation, and partnership.

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