As Africa sleeps, developed nations discuss next generation wireless telecommunications networks known as 5G

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Nations around the world, especially those from developed nations, are looking ahead and discussing how to best tackle the escalating cyber threats facing the planet. But African nations are completely missing from the debates.

On Friday, the United States praised the Czech Republic for hosting the just concluded 5G Security Conference.

The meeting in Prague focused on the need for secure telecommunications networks as the game-changing next generation wireless telecommunications networks, known as 5G.

5G is becoming the new global system and discussions are taking place everywhere.

In Washington D.C., there are countless conversations and interactions every day on what is to come.

In Prague, government officials from more than 30 countries across the globe, alongside representatives from the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and industry, participated in discussions regarding the important national security, economic, and commercial considerations that must be part of each country’s evaluation of 5G vendors, the White House said in a statement.

Attendees also agreed that important considerations in 5G network architecture include the security of supply chains for telecommunications networks and infrastructure and the risks associated with vendors vulnerable to third country influence.

“The United States supports the resulting Prague Proposals on 5G security published by the Czech conference chairman as a set of recommendations for nations to consider as they design, construct, and administer their 5G infrastructure.  The United States Government plans to use the Prague Proposals as a guide to ensure our shared prosperity and security,” the White House said.

But in Africa, there is complete silence. The focus of what would drastically transform the world and the way human beings communicate or the type of information they receive or share is all missing in most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Born in a small village in Cameroon, groomed in Nigeria's most populous city of Lagos, and now in Washington D.C. to practice journalism at a global level, Simon is an investigative journalist and publisher of TODAY NEWS AFRICA based in Washington DC
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Simon Ateba | Today News Africa
Born in a small village in Cameroon, groomed in Nigeria's most populous city of Lagos, and now in Washington D.C. to practice journalism at a global level, Simon is an investigative journalist and publisher of TODAY NEWS AFRICA based in Washington DC

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