U.S. coronavirus infections break record, hit nearly 46,000 in a single day

The United States recorded nearly 46,000 new coronavirus infections on Friday, the highest number in a single day since the pandemic hit here several months ago. Coronavirus cases are up in over 20 states and territories around the United States.

NBC News tally put the new increase on Friday at 45,942 new infections, with more than 8000 cases coming from Florida alone, and thousands more from Texas, Arizona and California.

Friday’s one-day increase surpassed a record set Wednesday when 45,557 new cases were reported.

President Donald Trump has attributed the new increases to testing, but health the uptick in new cases and hospitalization is due to much of the country’s reopening when there were still many active coronavirus cases.

According to NBC News, “among all states, Arizona has seen the highest per-capita rate of coronavirus cases in the last two weeks, logging more than 400 per 100,000 residents. Arizona has 7 million residents, and its 30,000-plus new cases in that time period only falls short of the increases in California, Texas and Florida.”

With coronavirus cases skyrocketing in Florida, the Mayor of Miami-Dade County Carlos A. Gimenez announced late on Friday that beaches will be closed for the July 4 weekend.

Parks will also be off-limits for public viewing of fireworks, Mayor Gimenez said in a statement.

Cases have been rising rapidly in Florida since Wednesday when the state first broke its single-day record with 5,508 new cases. On Friday, 8,942 cases were reported in Florida.

According to the state’s Health Department, that record was broken again on Saturday with Florida reporting more than 9,500 new confirmed cases.

Chief White House Correspondent for

Simon Ateba is Chief White House Correspondent for Today News Africa. Simon covers President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, the U.S. government, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other financial and international institutions in Washington D.C. and New York City.

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