U.S. government asks Americans not to travel to Ethiopia as conflict worsens and TPLF fighters advance toward capital

The U.S. Department of States raised the travel advisory level for Ethiopia to level 4 (Do Not Travel) on November 2, 2021, replacing the previous travel advisory issued on June 7, 2021. 

The United States government on Tuesday advised Americans not to travel to Ethiopia citing “armed conflict, civil unrest, communications disruptions, crime, and the potential for terrorism and kidnapping in border areas.”

The U.S. Department of States raised the travel advisory level for Ethiopia to level 4 (Do Not Travel) on November 2, 2021, replacing the previous travel advisory issued on June 7, 2021. 

The U.S. government said “travel to Ethiopia is unsafe at this time due to the ongoing armed conflict. Incidents of civil unrest and ethnic violence may occur without warning.”

“Further escalation is likely, and may cause supply chain shortages, communications blackouts and travel disruptions.  The Ethiopian government declared a state of emergency on November 2, 2021. The Government of Ethiopia has previously restricted or shut down internet, cellular data, and phone services during and after civil unrest. These restrictions impede the U.S. Embassy’s ability to communicate with, and provide consular services to, U.S. citizens in Ethiopia. The U.S. Embassy has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Addis Ababa. U.S. Embassy personnel are currently restricted from traveling outside of Addis Ababa city limits,” the U.S. government added. 

Earlier on Tuesday, Ethiopian government declared a state of emergency and called on its citizens to pick up arms and prepare to defend Addis Ababa, the capital, as the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) fighters continued to make significant gains.

TPLF combatants, who have been fighting Ethiopian defense forces for about a year, captured two key towns in just days and began making advances toward Addis Ababa.

Tigray|TIGRAYAN FORCES 
Tigray|

Reports quoted diplomats as saying that there were signs several of Ethiopian Army units had collapsed or retreated.

The Justice Minister Cedion Timothewos told a news conference that under the state of emergency which will last six months, any citizen over 18 could be called to fight.

It also gives Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, sweeping powers to arrest and detains opponents or critics, impose curfews and restrict news media.

“Those who own weapons will be obliged to hand them over to the government,” Timothewos said.

Reports said house-to-house searches were being conducted in search of Tigrayan sympathizers in Addis-Ababa after the city administrator called on citizens to use their weapons to defend their neighborhood.

In Washington D.C., U.S. Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa, Jeffrey Feltman, called on all parties to lay down their weapons and negotiate.

Feltman also urged the TPLF not to try to take the capital.

Feltman also warned on Tuesday that the deliberate starvation of people in Tigray by the Ethiopian government would constitute war crimes, according to the United Nations.

Delivering remarks at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, one year since the conflict in northern Ethiopia began, Ambassador Feltman said the humanitarian conditions in Tigray are “unacceptable.”

Abiy Ahmed 
Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali

Feltman asserted that using food as a weapon of war or imposing restrictions that deliberately prevent food and humanitarian assistance from reaching the people as the Ethiopian government is currently doing would constitute war crimes, according to the United Nations.

He said only 13 percent of humanitarian assistance is reaching the people in Tigray because of actions being taken by the administration of Abiy Ahmed Ali, the Prime Minister of Ethiopia, who won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize.

He said it was unconscionable that the assistance is available but is being prevented from reaching the people in northern in Ethiopia because of government restrictions.

The U.S. envoy called on all parties to sit down, drop down their weapons, and negotiate, and citing studies that state that an average civil war now lasts 20 years on average.

Jeffrey D. Feltman speaking at The London Conference on Afghanistan in 2014. Photo taken by Patrick Tsui 
Jeffrey D. Feltman speaking at The London Conference on Afghanistan in 2014. Photo taken by Patrick Tsui

A civil war in Ethiopia will be “disastrous” for Ethiopia and and Ethiopians, Feltman added.

He condemned the expansions of operations by the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) into Amhara and Afar, saying that they were pushing many people to flee the region, and also exacerbating a humanitarian crisis there.

Feltman rejected insinuations that the Biden administration was supporting the TPLF, saying the aim of the U.S. government is to bring about peace and stability in Ethiopia.

He said the U.S. government has repeatedly condemned actions by the TPLF but acknowledged that with the actions being taken by the Ethiopian government are also leading to reactions from TPLF.

40th Anniversary of the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front (TPLF)- Mekelle (Ethiopia) 
(Illustration

Feltman also called on the Eritrean government to withdraw troops from Ethiopia for a return of peace and stability in Ethiopia.

Tigray’s defense forces 
Tigray’s defense forces
Chief White House Correspondent for

Simon Ateba is Chief White House Correspondent for Today News Africa. Simon covers President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, the U.S. government, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other financial and international institutions in Washington D.C. and New York City.

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