January 13, 2023

U.S. Special Envoy for global food security Gary Fowler travels to Egypt for the crucial 2022 United Nations Climate Conference (COP27)

Special Envoy for Global Food Security Dr. Cary Fowler delivers remarks at a virtual roundtable discussion with the private sector on “Food Security Issues Arising from Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine” hosted by Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, from the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., on June 6, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/
Special Envoy for Global Food Security Dr. Cary Fowler delivers remarks at a virtual roundtable discussion with the private sector on “Food Security Issues Arising from Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine” hosted by Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, from the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., on June 6, 2022. [State Department photo by Freddie Everett/

The United States Special Envoy for Global Food Security Cary Fowler is traveling to Egypt for the crucial United Nations Climate Conference also known as COP27.

Fowler will travel to Paris, France, and Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, November 6-15, for meetings with the Organization for Economic Development (OECD), French officials, and the 2022 United Nations Climate Conference (COP27).

“In Paris, he will meet with OECD Ambassadors to discuss the U.S. Global Fertilizer Challenge and opportunities for collaboration on fertilizer and food security ahead of COP27,” the State Department said in a statement on Sunday. “He will also meet with French foreign ministry and development officials to discuss food security cooperation. Special Envoy Fowler will underscore the increasing need to enhance agricultural climate resilience to improve global food security.” 

The U.S. government added that in Sharm El-Sheikh, Special Envoy Fowler will deliver remarks at the Preparing for Change: A Whole-of-Government Approach to Food and Water Security side event, and highlight the progress that has been made over the past year on agriculture, food security, market access, and water security, and reinforce the need to do more under the President’s Emergency Plan for Adaptation and Resilience (PREPARE).  

“Special Envoy Fowler will also participate in the Agriculture Innovation Mission for Climate (AIM for Climate) ministerial event, which will focus on driving more rapid and transformative climate action in the agricultural sector.

He will also hold discussions with public and private food security experts on the need to adapt agriculture to a changing climate.

The World Health Organization warned on Sunday that the worsening climate crisis continues to make millions of people sick and jeopardizes lives, asserting that health must be at the core of COP27 climate negotiations in Egypt.

The WHO urged participants to conclude the climate summit in “with progress on the four key goals of mitigation, adaptation, financing and collaboration to tackle the climate crisis.”

It added that COP27 will be a crucial opportunity for the world to come together and re-commit to keeping the 1.5 °C Paris Agreement goal alive.

“Climate change is making millions of people sick or more vulnerable to disease all over the world and the increasing destructiveness of extreme weather events disproportionately affects poor and marginalized communities,” wrote Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “It is crucial that leaders and decision makers come together at COP27 to put health at the heart of the negotiations.”

The WHO added that “our health depends on the health of the ecosystems that surround us, and these ecosystems are now under threat from deforestation, agriculture and other changes in land use and rapid urban development.”

“The encroachment ever further into animal habitats is increasing opportunities for viruses harmful to humans to make the transition from their animal host. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause approximately 250 000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhoea and heat stress. The direct damage costs to health (i.e., excluding costs in health-determining sectors such as agriculture and water and sanitation), is estimated to be between US$ 2–4 billion per year by 2030,” it said.

The WHO, however, concluded that “there is room for hope, particularly if governments take action now to honor the pledges made at Glasgow in November 2021 and to go further in resolving the climate crisis.”


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