We imposed new tariffs on alcohol and tobacco to protect Nigerians against premature death – government Updated for 2021

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Updated: March 2, 2021


In a statement on Sunday by Hassan Dodo, the Director of information at the Nigerian ministry of finance, the government rejected reports that the new tariffs on alcoholic beverages and tobacco were targeted at local manufacturers. They were imposed to raise revenues and protect Nigerians from premature death, the government said.

“The new excise regime seeks to achieve a dual benefit of raising the Government’s revenues to support the nation’s growth and reducing the health hazards associated with tobacco-related diseases and alcohol abuse,” the government said.

Local manufacturers’ lobbyists have been pushing back against the new excise duty rates which came into effect on Monday, June, 4, 2018.

They have argued that the new rates were targeted at the local manufacturers. But the government in a statement did not seem to buy that argument.

Read Nigerian government full statement below


The attention of the Federal Ministry of Finance has been drawn to media reports that the new excise duty rates approved by President Muhammadu Buhari on alcoholic beverages and tobacco were targeted at local manufacturers.

The Ministry wishes to unequivocally state that the new excise duty rates which came into effect from Monday, 4th June, 2018, were not targeted at the local manufacturers.

The new excise regime seeks to achieve a dual benefit of raising the Government’s revenues to support the nation’s growth and reducing the health hazards associated with tobacco-related diseases and alcohol abuse.

Contrary to claims that the rates were selectively imposed on local manufacturers, there is currently a 60 per cent duty rate imposed on imported alcoholic beverages and tobacco as part of measures by the Government to encourage local production and protect local manufacturing industry. It should also be noted that beer and stout are currently under import prohibition to protect the industry from unfair competition from foreign brands.

In addition, other locally excisable products such as non-alcoholic beverages, cosmetics, perfumes, corrugated papers or paper boards and cartons have no excise duties.

We wish to clarify that the approved excise duty rates followed all-encompassing engagements with key industry stakeholders by the Tariff Technical Committee (TTC), of which Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN) is a member. The stakeholders’ engagements contributed to the final recommendation.

The Federal Government remains committed to the industrialization agenda and shall continue to put in place fiscal policy measures to protect local manufacturers and stimulate the growth of the economy.


Signed: Hassan Dodo, Director (Information)

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Simon Ateba
Simon Ateba
Simon Ateba covers the White House, the U.S. government, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other financial and international institutions for Today News Africa in Washington D.C. Simon can be reached on simonateba@todaynewsafrica.com

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